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deep

[deep]
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adjective, deep·er, deep·est.
  1. extending far down from the top or surface: a deep well; a deep valley.
  2. extending far in or back from the front or from an edge, surface, opening, etc., considered as the front: a deep shelf.
  3. extending far in width; broad: deep lace; a deep border.
  4. ranging far from the earth and sun: a deep space probe.
  5. having a specified dimension in depth: a tank 8 feet deep.
  6. covered or immersed to a specified depth (often used in combination): standing knee-deep in water.
  7. having a specified width or number of items from front to back (often used in combination): shelves that are 10 inches deep; cars lined up at the entrance gates three-deep.
  8. extending or cutting far down relative to the surface of a given object: The knife made a deep scar in the table.
  9. situated far down, in, or back: deep below the surface; deep in the woods.
  10. reaching or advancing far down: a deep dive.
  11. coming from far down: a deep breath.
  12. made with the body bent or lowered to a considerable degree: a deep bow.
  13. immersed or submerged in or heavily covered with (followed by in): a road deep in mud.
  14. difficult to penetrate or understand; abstruse: a deep allegory.
  15. not superficial; profound: deep thoughts.
  16. grave or serious: deep disgrace.
  17. heartfelt; sincere: deep affections.
  18. absorbing; engrossing: deep study.
  19. great in measure; intense; extreme: deep sorrow.
  20. sound and heavy; profound: deep sleep.
  21. (of colors) dark and vivid: a deep red.
  22. low in pitch, as sound, a voice, or the like: deep, sonorous tones.
  23. having penetrating intellectual powers: a deep scholar.
  24. profoundly cunning or artful: a deep and crafty scheme.
  25. mysterious; obscure: deep, dark secrets.
  26. immersed or involved; enveloped: a man deep in debt.
  27. absorbed; engrossed: deep in thought.
  28. Baseball. relatively far from home plate: He hit the ball into deep center field.
  29. Linguistics. belonging to an early stage in the transformational derivation of a sentence; belonging to the deep structure.
noun
  1. the deep part of a body of water, especially an area of the ocean floor having a depth greater than 18,000 feet (5400 meters).
  2. a vast extent, as of space or time.
  3. the part of greatest intensity, as of winter.
  4. Nautical. any of the unmarked levels, one fathom apart, on a deep-sea lead line.Compare mark1(def 20).
  5. the deep, Chiefly Literary. the sea or ocean: He was laid to rest in the deep.
adverb, deep·er, deep·est.
  1. to or at a considerable or specified depth: The boat rode deep in the water.
  2. far on in time: He claimed he could see deep into the future.
  3. profoundly; intensely.
  4. Baseball. at or to a deep place or position: The outfielders played deep, knowing the batter's reputation as a slugger.
Idioms
  1. go off the deep end,
    1. to enter upon a course of action with heedless or irresponsible indifference to consequences.
    2. to become emotionally overwrought.
  2. in deep,
    1. inextricably involved.
    2. having made or committed oneself to make a large financial investment.
  3. in deep water,
    1. in difficult or serious circumstances; in trouble.
    2. in a situation beyond the range of one's capability or skill: You're a good student, but you'll be in deep water in medical school.

Origin of deep

before 900; Middle English dep, Old English dēop; akin to Gothic diups, Old Norse djupr, Old High German tiof
Related formsdeep·ness, nounnon·deep, adjectiveo·ver·deep, adjectiveun·deep, adjectiveun·deep·ly, adverb

Synonyms

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14. recondite, mysterious, obscure, profound. 23. sagacious, wise, profound, shrewd.

Antonyms

1, 10, 15–17, 23. shallow.

end1

[end]
noun
  1. the last part or extremity, lengthwise, of anything that is longer than it is wide or broad: the end of a street; the end of a rope.
  2. a point, line, or limitation that indicates the full extent, degree, etc., of something; limit; bounds: kindness without end; to walk from end to end of a city.
  3. a part or place at or adjacent to an extremity: at the end of the table; the west end of town.
  4. the furthermost imaginable place or point: an island at the very end of the world.
  5. termination; conclusion: The journey was coming to an end.
  6. the concluding part: The end of her speech had to be cut short because of time.
  7. an intention or aim: to gain one's ends.
  8. the object for which a thing exists; purpose: The happiness of the people is the end of government.
  9. an outcome or result: What is to be the end of all this bickering?
  10. termination of existence; death: He met a horrible end.
  11. a cause of death, destruction, or ruin: Another war would be the end of civilization.
  12. a remnant or fragment: mill end; ends and trimmings.
  13. a share or part in something: He does his end of the job very well.
  14. Textiles. a warp thread running vertically and interlaced with the filling yarn in the woven fabric.
  15. Football.
    1. either of the linemen stationed farthest from the center.
    2. the position played by this lineman.
  16. Archery. the number of arrows to be shot by a competitor during one turn in a match.
  17. Cricket. a wicket, especially the one where the batsman is taking a turn.
  18. a unit of a game, as in curling or lawn bowling.
  19. Kantianism. any rational being, regarded as worthy to exist for its own sake.
  20. either half of a domino.
  21. Knots. the part of a rope, beyond a knot or the like, that is not used.
  22. the end, Slang. the ultimate; the utmost of good or bad: His stupidity is the end.
verb (used with object)
  1. to bring to an end or conclusion: We ended the discussion on a note of optimism.
  2. to put an end to; terminate: This was the battle that ended the war.
  3. to form the end of: This passage ends the novel.
  4. to cause the demise of; kill: A bullet through the heart ended him.
  5. to constitute the most outstanding or greatest possible example or instance of (usually used in the infinitive): You just committed the blunder to end all blunders.
verb (used without object)
  1. to come to an end; terminate; cease: The road ends at Rome.
  2. to issue or result: Extravagance ends in want.
  3. to reach or arrive at a final condition, circumstance, or goal (often followed by up): to end up in the army; to end as a happy person.
adjective
  1. final or ultimate: the end result.
Idioms
  1. at loose ends, without an occupation or plans; unsettled; uncertain: He spent two years wandering about the country at loose ends.
  2. at one's wit's end, at the end of one's ideas or mental resources; perplexed: I'm at my wit's end with this problem.Also at one's wits' end.
  3. end for end, in reverse position; inverted: The cartons were turned end for end.
  4. end on, with the end next to or facing: He backed the truck until it was end on with the loading platform.
  5. end to end, in a row with ends touching: The pipes were placed end to end on the ground.
  6. go off the deep end, Informal. to act in a reckless or agitated manner; lose emotional control: She went off the deep end when she lost her job.
  7. in the end, finally; after all: In the end they shook hands and made up.
  8. keep/hold one's end up, to perform one's part or share adequately: The work is demanding, but he's holding his end up.
  9. make an end of, to conclude; stop: Let's make an end of this foolishness and get down to work.
  10. make ends meet, to live within one's means: Despite her meager income, she tried to make ends meet.Also make both ends meet.
  11. no end, Informal. very much or many: They were pleased no end by the warm reception.
  12. on end,
    1. having the end down; upright: to stand a box on end.
    2. continuously; successively: They talked for hours on end.
  13. put an end to, to cause to stop; terminate; finish: The advent of sound in motion pictures put an end to many a silent star's career.

Origin of end1

before 900; Middle English, Old English ende; cognate with Old Frisian enda, Middle Dutch e(i)nde, Old Saxon endi, Old High German anti, G Ende, Old Norse endi(r), Gothic andeis end < Germanic *anthjá-; akin to Sanskrit ánta- end
Related formsend·er, noun

Synonyms

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4. tip, bound, limit, terminus.

Synonym study

5. End, close, conclusion, finish, outcome refer to the termination of something. End implies a natural termination or completion, or an attainment of purpose: the end of a day, of a race; to some good end. Close often implies a planned rounding off of something in process: the close of a conference. Conclusion suggests a decision or arrangement: All evidence leads to this conclusion; the conclusion of peace terms. Finish emphasizes completion of something begun: a fight to the finish. Outcome suggests the issue of something that was in doubt: the outcome of a game. 7. See aim.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018
British Dictionary definitions for go off the deep end

deep

adjective
  1. extending or situated relatively far down from a surfacea deep pool
  2. extending or situated relatively far inwards, backwards, or sidewaysa deep border of trees
  3. cricket relatively far from the pitchthe deep field; deep third man
    1. (postpositive)of a specified dimension downwards, inwards, or backwardssix feet deep
    2. (in combination)a six-foot-deep trench
  4. coming from or penetrating to a great deptha deep breath
  5. difficult to understand or penetrate; abstruse
  6. learned or intellectually demandinga deep discussion
  7. of great intensity; extremedeep happiness; deep trouble
  8. (postpositive foll by in) absorbed or enveloped (by); engrossed or immersed (in)deep in study; deep in debt
  9. very cunning or crafty; deviousa deep plot
  10. mysterious or obscurea deep secret
  11. (of a colour) having an intense or dark hue
  12. low in pitch or tonea deep voice
  13. go off the deep end informal
    1. to lose one's temper; react angrily
    2. mainly USto act rashly
  14. in deep water in a tricky position or in trouble
  15. throw someone in at the deep end See end 1 (def. 28)
noun
  1. any deep place on land or under water, esp below 6000 metres (3000 fathoms)
  2. the deep
    1. a poetic term for the ocean
    2. cricketthe area of the field relatively far from the pitch
  3. the most profound, intense, or central partthe deep of winter
  4. a vast extent, as of space or time
  5. nautical one of the intervals on a sounding lead, one fathom apart
adverb
  1. far on in time; latethey worked deep into the night
  2. profoundly or intensely
  3. deep down informal in reality, esp as opposed to appearanceshe is a very kind person deep down
  4. deep in the past long ago
Derived Formsdeeply, adverbdeepness, noun

Word Origin

Old English dēop; related to Old High German tiof deep, Old Norse djupr

end1

noun
  1. the extremity of the length of something, such as a road, line, etc
  2. the surface at either extremity of a three-dimensional object
  3. the extreme extent, limit, or degree of something
  4. the most distant place or time that can be imaginedthe ends of the earth
  5. the time at which something is concluded
    1. the last section or part
    2. (as modifier)the end office Related adjectives: final, terminal, ultimate
  6. a share or parthis end of the bargain
  7. (often plural) a remnant or fragment (esp in the phrase odds and ends)
  8. a final state, esp death; destruction
  9. the purpose of an action or existence
  10. sport either of the two defended areas of a playing field, rink, etc
  11. bowls curling a section of play from one side of the rink to the other
  12. American football a player at the extremity of the playing line; wing
  13. all ends up totally or completely
  14. a sticky end informal, US and Canadian an unpleasant death
  15. at a loose end or US and Canadian at loose ends without purpose or occupation
  16. at an end exhausted or completed
  17. at the end of the day See day (def. 10)
  18. come to an end to become completed or exhausted
  19. end on
    1. with the end pointing towards one
    2. with the end adjacent to the end of another object
  20. go off the deep end informal to lose one's temper; react angrily
  21. get one's end away slang to have sexual intercourse
  22. in the end finally
  23. keep one's end up
    1. to sustain one's part in a joint enterprise
    2. to hold one's own in an argument, contest, etc
  24. make ends meet or make both ends meet to spend no more than the money one has
  25. no end or no end of informal (intensifier)I had no end of work
  26. on end
    1. upright
    2. without pause or interruption
  27. the end informal
    1. the worst, esp something that goes beyond the limits of endurance
    2. mainly USthe best in quality
  28. the end of the road the point beyond which survival or continuation is impossible
  29. throw someone in at the deep end to put someone into a new situation, job, etc, without preparation or introduction
verb
  1. to bring or come to a finish; conclude
  2. to die or cause to die
  3. (tr) to surpass; outdoa novel to end all novels
  4. end it all informal to commit suicide
See also end up
Derived Formsender, noun

Word Origin

Old English ende; related to Old Norse endir, Gothic andeis, Old High German endi, Latin antiae forelocks, Sanskrit antya last

end2

verb
  1. (tr) British to put (hay or grain) into a barn or stack

Word Origin

Old English innian; related to Old High German innōn; see inn
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for go off the deep end

deep

n.

Old English deop "deep water," especially the sea, from the source of deep (adj.).

end

v.

Old English endian, from the source of end (n.). Related: Ended; ending.

end

n.

Old English ende "end, conclusion, boundary, district, species, class," from Proto-Germanic *andja (cf. Old Frisian enda, Old Dutch ende, Dutch einde, Old Norse endir "end;" Old High German enti "top, forehead, end," German ende, Gothic andeis "end"), originally "the opposite side," from PIE *antjo "end, boundary," from root *ant- "opposite, in front of, before" (see ante).

Original sense of "outermost part" is obsolete except in phrase ends of the earth. Sense of "destruction, death" was in Old English. Meaning "division or quarter of a town" was in Old English. The end "the last straw, the limit" (in a disparaging sense) is from 1929.

The phrase end run is first attested 1902 in U.S. football; extended to military tactics in World War II; general figurative sense is from 1968. End time in reference to the end of the world is from 1917. To end it all "commit suicide" is attested by 1911. Be-all and end-all is from Shakespeare ("Macbeth" I.vii.5).

Worldly wealth he cared not for, desiring onely to make both ends meet. [Thomas Fuller, "The History of the Worthies of England," 1662]

deep

adj.

Old English deop "profound, awful, mysterious; serious, solemn; deepness, depth," deope (adv.), from Proto-Germanic *deupaz (cf. Old Saxon diop, Old Frisian diap, Dutch diep, Old High German tiof, German tief, Old Norse djupr, Danish dyb, Swedish djup, Gothic diups "deep"), from PIE *dheub- "deep, hollow" (cf. Lithuanian dubus "deep, hollow, Old Church Slavonic duno "bottom, foundation," Welsh dwfn "deep," Old Irish domun "world," via sense development from "bottom" to "foundation" to "earth" to "world").

Figurative senses were in Old English; extended 16c. to color, sound. Deep pocket "wealth" is from 1951. To go off the deep end "lose control of oneself" is slang first recorded 1921, probably in reference to the deep end of a swimming pool, where a person on the surface can no longer touch bottom. When 3-D films seemed destined to be the next wave and the biggest thing to hit cinema since talkies, they were known as deepies (1953).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

go off the deep end in Culture

go off the deep end

To act recklessly or hysterically: “The students were behaving themselves at the party, but then a couple of kids started to go off the deep end.”

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with go off the deep end

go off the deep end

1

Become unduly excited, overwrought, or angry. For example, When he heard about John's smashing into his car, he went off the deep end. [c. 1920] Also see in deep, def. 2.

2

Be irrationally carried away, act irresponsibly or heedlessly. For example, Just because you like her looks doesn't mean you should go off the deep end and propose. [c. 1920] In both of these colloquial usages deep end alludes to the deep end of a swimming pool.

deep

In addition to the idioms beginning with deep

also see:

end

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.