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heed

[heed] /hid/
verb (used with object)
1.
to give careful attention to:
He did not heed the warning.
verb (used without object)
2.
to give attention; have regard.
noun
3.
careful attention; notice; observation (usually with give or take).
Origin of heed
900
before 900; Middle English heden, Old English hēdan; cognate with German hüten to guard, protect; akin to hood1
Related forms
heeder, noun
unheeded, adjective
unheededly, adverb
unheeding, adjective
unheedingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. note, observe, consider, mark. 3. consideration, care; caution, vigilance, watchfulness.
Antonyms
1. disregard, ignore.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for heeded
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The word "ought" was not heeded at Constantinople, but the word "must" was understood fully there.

    The Grand Old Man Richard B. Cook
  • I heeded not the gay smiles and free merriment of those around me.

  • But Mirandy, pouring her batter into the pan, heeded him no more than was her wont.

    Meadow Grass Alice Brown
  • Theodora heeded him not, for she was absorbed in the ideas that crowded upon her mind.

    Gomez Arias Joaqun Telesforo de Trueba y Coso
  • And, like him, I heeded not the menace of the things I had witnessed.

    Wanderer of Infinity Harl Vincent
British Dictionary definitions for heeded

heed

/hiːd/
noun
1.
close and careful attention; notice (often in the phrases give, pay, or take heed)
verb
2.
to pay close attention to (someone or something)
Derived Forms
heeder, noun
heedful, adjective
heedfully, adverb
heedfulness, noun
Word Origin
Old English hēdan; related to Old Saxon hōdian, Old High German huoten
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for heeded

heed

n.

"attention, notice, regard," early 14c., apparently from heed (v.). Survives only in literal use and as the object of verbs (take heed, etc.).

heed

v.

Old English hedan "to heed, observe; to take care, attend," from West Germanic *hodjan (cf. Old Saxon hodian, Old Frisian hoda, Middle Dutch and Dutch hoeden, Old High German huotan, German hüten "to guard, watch"), from PIE *kadh- "to shelter, cover" (see hat). Related: Heeded; heeding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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