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Henryson

/ˈhɛnrɪsən/
noun
1.
Robert. ?1430–?1506, Scottish poet. His works include Testament of Cresseid (1593), a sequel to Chaucer's Troilus and Cressida, the 13 Moral Fables of Esope the Phrygian, and the pastoral dialogue Robene and Makyne
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Examples from the Web for henryson
Historical Examples
  • henryson (Robert), a complete edition of his poems a desideratum, 38.

  • henryson has it in his Robene and Makyne, I haif thee luvit loud and still.

    The Bruce John Barbour
  • “I believe we are going to have a pleasant afternoon, after all,” said Mrs. henryson.

    Vistas of New York Brander Matthews
  • How good it could be, without any convention at all, henryson showed once for all in our own language by Robene and Makyne.

  • A scholar and a man of distinguished position, he has none of the lightness of henryson.

    Chaucer and His Times Grace E. Hadow
  • His moral and religious poems had their prototypes, even in Scotland, in such poets as Johnston and henryson.

    Ephemera Critica John Churton Collins
  • In all henryson's poems there are only three short passages which could by any possibility be described as florid.

    Ephemera Critica John Churton Collins
  • Among the Scotch poets of the fifteenth century a prominent place should have been given to henryson who is not even mentioned.

    Ephemera Critica John Churton Collins
  • Mrs. henryson paused to look into one of the broad windows of a gigantic store.

    Vistas of New York Brander Matthews
  • At last Mrs. henryson tore herself away from the window with its flamboyant head-gear.

    Vistas of New York Brander Matthews

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