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2017 Word of the Year

hit-or-miss

[hit-er-mis] /ˈhɪt ərˈmɪs/
adjective
1.
careless; inattentive; haphazard:
The professor criticized the hit-or-miss quality of our research.
Origin of hit-or-miss
1600-1610
First recorded in 1600-10
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for hit-or-miss
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • This has a virtuosity of its own, for all its hit-or-miss appearance.

    Picture and Text Henry James
  • You've realized that marriage isn't a hit-or-miss proposition.

    A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband Louise Bennett Weaver
  • There was a blue-and-white, hit-or-miss rag rug on the floor.

  • Matrimony should not be committed in a round-about, indirect, hit-or-miss manner.

    Dennison Grant Robert Stead
  • Out-crossing or mixing in of new blood is better than hit-or-miss inbreeding.

    The Dollar Hen Milo M. Hastings
  • Do not work and live "hit-or-miss" in your activities day by day.

    Supreme Personality Delmer Eugene Croft
  • Augusta gave him a hit-or-miss kiss in the dark, climbed into her bed and went obediently to sleep like a child.

    The Hills of Desire Richard Aumerle Maher
  • The place was an undistinguished little log town that rambled back from the river up the hill in a hit-or-miss fashion.

    The Yukon Trail

    William MacLeod Raine
  • The preparations to secure the York boat against the threatening storm were highly characteristic of her hit-or-miss crew.

    Two on the Trail

    Hulbert Footner

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6
5
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