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hoodwink

[hoo d-wingk] /ˈhʊdˌwɪŋk/
verb (used with object)
1.
to deceive or trick.
2.
Archaic. to blindfold.
3.
Obsolete. to cover or hide.
Origin of hoodwink
1555-1565
First recorded in 1555-65; hood1 + wink1
Related forms
hoodwinkable, adjective
hoodwinker, noun
unhoodwinked, adjective
Synonyms
1. dupe, cheat, swindle, gyp.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for hoodwinked
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • But Themistocles was not the man to be hoodwinked by the simple cunning of the Spartans.

  • You imagine that a man like that can be played with, and hoodwinked by amateurs like yourself.

    The Market-Place Harold Frederic
  • They must have thought they had hoodwinked me and were probably then rejoicing at their success.

  • Their safety required a Governor who could be controlled or hoodwinked by them.

    Rabbi and Priest

    Milton Goldsmith
  • I was not hoodwinked, but neither was I stirred to resistance.

    The King's Mirror Anthony Hope
  • Indeed I had had it from her own lips that she had played with this man, even as she had hoodwinked the prince.

    Princess Zara Ross Beeckman
  • Surely these fine, independent fellows were not to be hoodwinked by the jingoes!

    The Patrician John Galsworthy
  • The Commissioners turned out to be able men, who were not to be hoodwinked.

    The Settler and the Savage R.M. Ballantyne
British Dictionary definitions for hoodwinked

hoodwink

/ˈhʊdˌwɪŋk/
verb (transitive)
1.
to dupe; trick
2.
(obsolete) to cover or hide
Derived Forms
hoodwinker, noun
Word Origin
C16: originally, to cover the eyes with a hood, blindfold
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hoodwinked

hoodwink

v.

1560s, "to blindfold," from hood (n.1) + wink; figurative sense of "mislead, deceive" is c.1600. Related: Hoodwinked; hoodwinking.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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22
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