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idiomatic

[id-ee-uh-mat-ik]
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adjective
  1. peculiar to or characteristic of a particular language or dialect: idiomatic French.
  2. containing or using many idioms.
  3. having a distinct style or character, especially in the arts: idiomatic writing; an idiomatic composer.
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Also id·i·o·mat·i·cal.

Origin of idiomatic

1705–15; < Late Greek idiōmatikós, equivalent to idiōmat- (stem of idíōma) idiom + -ikos -ic
Related formsid·i·o·mat·i·cal·ly, adverbid·i·o·mat·i·cal·ness, id·i·o·ma·tic·i·ty [id-ee-oh-muh-tis-i-tee] /ˌɪd i oʊ məˈtɪs ɪ ti/, nounnon·id·i·o·mat·ic, adjectivenon·id·i·o·mat·i·cal, adjectivenon·id·i·o·mat·i·cal·ly, adverbnon·id·i·o·mat·i·cal·ness, nounun·id·i·o·mat·ic, adjectiveun·id·i·o·mat·i·cal·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for idiomatically

Historical Examples

  • If he looked ahead he would see what we idiomatically know as his "finish."

    The Conquest of Fear

    Basil King

  • "Me either," said Mrs. Treacher, idiomatically, and bent over the basket.

    Major Vigoureux

    A. T. Quiller-Couch

  • Idiomatically, "the bores, the spoil-sports, or wet-blankets."

    An Englishman in Paris

    Albert D. (Albert Dresden) Vandam

  • Picard, the one-legged soldier, idiomatically expressed the thought of the Salle.

    Wounded and a Prisoner of War

    Malcolm V. (Malcolm Vivian) Hay

  • Colin answered him more quickly and idiomatically than Sir Henry had expected.


Word Origin and History for idiomatically

idiomatic

adj.

1712, from Latin idiomaticus, from Greek idiomatikos; from idios "one's own" (see idiom) + matos "thinking, animated" (see automaton).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper