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inaudible

[in-aw-duh-buh l] /ɪnˈɔ də bəl/
adjective
1.
not audible; incapable of being heard.
Origin of inaudible
1595-1605
First recorded in 1595-1605; in-3 + audible
Related forms
inaudibility, inaudibleness, noun
inaudibly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for inaudibly
Historical Examples
  • “Good-night, Adelaide,” I said, inaudibly; and she loosed my hand.

    The First Violin Jessie Fothergill
  • She muttered something, but inaudibly, and they went on as before.

    Davenport Dunn, Volume 1 (of 2) Charles James Lever
  • Insensibly and inaudibly my soul speaks to its own, and prepares it even now.

    Zanoni Edward Bulwer Lytton
  • "He has fooled you," she murmured, inaudibly, before he spoke.

    Rhoda Fleming, Complete George Meredith
  • I do, said Aunt Pussy, as inaudibly as a bride at the altar.

    The Romance of His Life

    Mary Cholmondeley
  • Her lips moved, at first inaudibly, but presently in a low murmur.

  • She freshly sprang to him and again they inaudibly conversed.

    What Maisie Knew

    Henry James
  • And why should he be brought to them, and be looked at strangely and spoken of inaudibly?

    When the Sleeper Wakes Herbert George Wells
  • A woman stands in my way, he inaudibly muttered with clinched teeth.

    An Oregon Girl Alfred Ernest Rice
  • "He is always in the air," murmured the Blue Prince, inaudibly.

    The King of Schnorrers Israel Zangwill
British Dictionary definitions for inaudibly

inaudible

/ɪnˈɔːdəbəl/
adjective
1.
not loud enough to be heard; not audible
Derived Forms
inaudibility, inaudibleness, noun
inaudibly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inaudibly

inaudible

adj.

mid-15c., "unfit to be heard;" c.1600, "unable to be heard," from Latin inaudibilis "inaudible," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + audibilis (see audible). Related: Inaudibly; inaudibility.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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15
18
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