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incarnate

[adjective in-kahr-nit, -neyt; verb in-kahr-neyt] /adjective ɪnˈkɑr nɪt, -neɪt; verb ɪnˈkɑr neɪt/
adjective
1.
embodied in flesh; given a bodily, especially a human, form:
a devil incarnate.
2.
personified or typified, as a quality or idea:
chivalry incarnate.
3.
flesh-colored or crimson.
verb (used with object), incarnated, incarnating.
4.
to put into or represent in a concrete form, as an idea:
The building incarnates the architect's latest theories.
5.
to be the embodiment or type of:
Her latest book incarnates the literature of our day.
6.
to embody in flesh; invest with a bodily, especially a human, form:
a man who incarnated wisdom and compassion.
Origin of incarnate
late Middle English
1350-1400
1350-1400; late Middle English < Late Latin incarnātus past participle of incarnāre to make into flesh, equivalent to in- in-2 + carn- flesh (see carnal) + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
nonincarnate, adjective
nonincarnated, adjective
unincarnate, adjective
unincarnated, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for incarnated
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Poliziano incarnated the genial, radiant, godless spirit of fifteenth-century humanism.

  • And that is why he must be incarnated again and again in the avatars.

    Appearances Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson
  • Only according to Strehlow, that which is incarnated is not a soul but a ratapa or a namatuna.

  • The throne of the King of the World is surrounded by millions of incarnated Gods.

    Beasts, Men and Gods Ferdinand Ossendowski
  • I am with you there, Miss Yardely, but romance does not lie in mere barbarism, for most men it is incarnated in a woman.

    A Mating in the Wilds Ottwell Binns
  • They have incarnated in him the people, the nation, the state, the law!

    Napoleon the Little Victor Hugo
  • It lay like an indigestible fear upon the stomach of incarnated Tradition.

    Gargoyles Ben Hecht
  • He incarnated a type that happily has vanished from the map of Africa.

    An African Adventure Isaac F. Marcosson
  • A characteristic is incarnated in a personage, and often indicated by his very name.

    The Age of Dryden Richard Garnett
British Dictionary definitions for incarnated

incarnate

adjective (usually immediately postpositive) (ɪnˈkɑːnɪt; -neɪt)
1.
possessing bodily form, esp the human form: a devil incarnate
2.
personified or typified: stupidity incarnate
3.
(esp of plant parts) flesh-coloured or pink
verb (transitive) (ɪnˈkɑːneɪt)
4.
to give a bodily or concrete form to
5.
to be representative or typical of
Word Origin
C14: from Late Latin incarnāre to make flesh, from Latin in-² + carō flesh
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for incarnated

incarnate

adj.

late 14c., from Late Latin incarnatus "made flesh," a common word among early Christian writers, past participle of Latin incarnare "to make flesh" (see incarnation).

v.

1530s, a back-formation from incarnation, or else from Latin incarnatus, past participle of incarnare (see incarnation). Related: Incarnated; incarnating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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