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indecorous

[in-dek-er-uh s, in-di-kawr-uh s, -kohr-]
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adjective
  1. not decorous; violating generally accepted standards of good taste or propriety; unseemly.
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Origin of indecorous

From the Latin word indecōrus, dating back to 1670–80. See in-3, decorous
Related formsin·dec·o·rous·ly, adverbin·dec·o·rous·ness, noun

Synonyms

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indecent, improper, inappropriate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for indecorously

Historical Examples

  • There we indecorously reposed on our backs and went stargazing in comfort.

    The Prairie Child

    Arthur Stringer

  • Not to be indecorously glad at so opportune an exit was all that could be expected from him.

    The Woman-Hater

    Charles Reade

  • It was indecorously hurried through the Commons and tossed to the Lords, at the close of the session of 1737.

  • Either the clean and decorously clad man, or the dirty and indecorously clad man.

    Tom Tiddler's Ground

    Charles Dickens

  • Thus a great part of his sermon was taken up in indecorously contending and taking issue with the king of España.


British Dictionary definitions for indecorously

indecorous

adjective
  1. improper or ungraceful; unseemly
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Derived Formsindecorously, adverbindecorousness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for indecorously

indecorous

adj.

1670s, from Latin indecorus "unbecoming, unseemly, unsightly," from in- "not, opposite of, without" (see in- (1)) + decorus "becoming, fitting, seemly, proper" (see decorous). Related: Indecorously; indecorousness.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper