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insinuate

[in-sin-yoo-eyt] /ɪnˈsɪn yuˌeɪt/
verb (used with object), insinuated, insinuating.
1.
to suggest or hint slyly:
He insinuated that they were lying.
2.
to instill or infuse subtly or artfully, as into the mind:
to insinuate doubts through propaganda.
3.
to bring or introduce into a position or relation by indirect or artful methods:
to insinuate oneself into favor.
verb (used without object), insinuated, insinuating.
4.
to make insinuations.
Origin of insinuate
1520-1530
1520-30; < Latin insinuātus, past participle of insinuāre to work in, instill. See in-2, sinuous, -ate1
Related forms
insinuative
[in-sin-yoo-ey-tiv, -yoo-uh-] /ɪnˈsɪn yuˌeɪ tɪv, -yu ə-/ (Show IPA),
insinuatory
[in-sin-yoo-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ɪnˈsɪn yu əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
insinuatively, adverb
insinuator, noun
half-insinuated, adjective
preinsinuate, verb, preinsinuated, preinsinuating.
preinsinuative, adjective
uninsinuated, adjective
uninsinuative, adjective
Synonyms
1. See hint. 2. introduce, inject, inculcate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for insinuate
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The reason is all mine, I do not insinuate that it is in any way yours.'

    Little Dorrit Charles Dickens
  • You must not think, as you seem to insinuate, that in my way of life I want exercise.

  • Do you mean to insinuate, you villain, that my wife stole her own diamonds?

  • I hope you don't mean to insinuate that I have but one friend!

    The Elm Tree Tales F. Irene Burge Smith
  • Oh, there was no misunderstanding what he meant to insinuate.

    Once to Every Man Larry Evans
British Dictionary definitions for insinuate

insinuate

/ɪnˈsɪnjʊˌeɪt/
verb
1.
(may take a clause as object) to suggest by indirect allusion, hints, innuendo, etc
2.
(transitive) to introduce subtly or deviously
3.
(transitive) to cause (someone, esp oneself) to be accepted by gradual approaches or manoeuvres
Derived Forms
insinuative, insinuatory, adjective
insinuator, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Latin insinuāre to wind one's way into, from in-² + sinus curve
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for insinuate
v.

1520s, from Latin insinuatus, past participle of insinuare "to throw in, push in, make a way; creep in, intrude, bring in by windings and curvings, wind one's way into," from in- "in" (see in- (2)) + sinuare "to wind, bend, curve," from sinus "a curve, winding." Sense of "to introduce tortuously or indirectly" is from 1640s. Related: Insinuated; insinuating; insinuatingly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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