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interlocutor

[in-ter-lok-yuh-ter]
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noun
  1. a person who takes part in a conversation or dialogue.
  2. the man in the middle of the line of performers in a minstrel troupe, who acts as the announcer and banters with the end men.
  3. a person who questions; interrogator.
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Origin of interlocutor

1505–15; < Latin interlocū-, variant stem of interloquī to speak between (inter- inter- + loquī to speak) + -tor
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for interlocutors

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • The characters of the three interlocutors also correspond to the parts which are assigned to them.

    Gorgias

    Plato

  • This was not much; his interlocutors, it would seem, knew more than he.

  • Before we proceed further, we will give some account of our interlocutors.

    Gryll Grange

    Thomas Love Peacock

  • She shot a glance of contempt at her interlocutors and pushed past them.

  • The character of the interlocutors and the division of the scenes is a little uncertain.

    Bible Studies

    Joseph M. Wheeler


British Dictionary definitions for interlocutors

interlocutor

noun
  1. a person who takes part in a conversation
  2. Also called: middleman the man in the centre of a troupe of minstrels who engages the others in talk or acts as announcer
  3. Scots law a decree by a judge
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Derived Formsinterlocutress, interlocutrice or interlocutrix, fem n
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for interlocutors

interlocutor

n.

1510s, agent noun from Latin interlocut-, past participle stem of interloqui "interrupt," from inter- "between" (see inter-) + loqui "to speak" (see locution). Related: Interlocutory.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper