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intrepid

[in-trep-id]
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adjective
  1. resolutely fearless; dauntless: an intrepid explorer.

Origin of intrepid

1690–1700; < Latin intrepidus, equivalent to in- in-3 + trepidus anxious; see trepidation
Related formsin·tre·pid·i·ty, in·trep·id·ness, nounin·trep·id·ly, adverb

Synonyms

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brave, courageous, bold.

Antonyms

timid.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for intrepidity

Historical Examples

  • Nothing, however, could check the intrepidity with which they advanced.

    The Life of Horatio Lord Nelson

    Robert Southey

  • Intrepidity is one of the least shining strokes in his character.

  • They had been selected for their intrepidity and hardihood from all the towns.

    King Philip

    John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott

  • He bore upon his person the stamp of intrepidity and assurance.

  • And it was intrepid, but in this intrepidity there was nothing aggressive.

    Under Western Eyes

    Joseph Conrad


British Dictionary definitions for intrepidity

intrepid

adjective
  1. fearless; daring; bold
Derived Formsintrepidity or intrepidness, nounintrepidly, adverb

Word Origin

C17: from Latin intrepidus, from in- 1 + trepidus fearful, timid
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for intrepidity

n.

1704, from intrepid + -ity.

intrepid

adj.

1620s (implied in intrepidness), from French intrépide (16c.) and directly from Latin intrepidus "unshaken, undaunted," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + trepidus "alarmed" (see trepidation). Related: Intrepidly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper