Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

Is irregardless a word?

inundate

[in-uh n-deyt, -uhn-, in-uhn-deyt] /ˈɪn ənˌdeɪt, -ʌn-, ɪnˈʌn deɪt/
verb (used with object), inundated, inundating.
1.
to flood; cover or overspread with water; deluge.
2.
to overwhelm:
inundated with letters of protest.
Origin of inundate
1615-1625
1615-25; < Latin inundātus, past participle of inundāre to flood, overflow, equivalent to in- in-2 + und(a) wave + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
inundation, noun
inundator, noun
inundatory
[in-uhn-duh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /ɪnˈʌn dəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
superinundation, noun
uninundated, adjective
Synonyms
2. glut.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for inundation
Historical Examples
  • We went to visit the grotto and the garden, where all was going on well--the embankment had prevented the inundation.

  • However, I had never seen an inundation before, and I may have been mistaken.

    Up the River Oliver Optic
  • The inundation was caused by an irruption of the sea, and many incidents are related of the flood.

    The Pictorial Press Mason Jackson
  • But we were now within the limits of the annual inundation; and but few plants can thrive there.

    The Quadroon Mayne Reid
  • In the pontificate of Nicholas V. it was destroyed by an inundation.

  • There is no reason whatever for this inundation of generic names.

    Bruin Mayne Reid
  • The inundation of the Nile cometh, yet no one goeth out to plough.

  • I suppose, however, you wear them as typical of the inundation of the Nile, so it is all right.

  • Thus, the inundation which devastated the banks of the Sane, fifteen years ago, had no effect on them.

    The Insect World Louis Figuier
  • Prouided, that the ground neither be boggy, nor the inundation be past 24.

    A New Orchard And Garden William Lawson
British Dictionary definitions for inundation

inundate

/ˈɪnʌnˌdeɪt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to cover completely with water; overflow; flood; swamp
2.
to overwhelm, as if with a flood: to be inundated with requests
Derived Forms
inundant, inundatory, adjective
inundation, noun
inundator, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Latin inundāre to flood, from unda wave
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for inundation
n.

early 15c., from Latin inundationem (nominative inundatio) "an overflowing," noun of action from past participle stem of inundare "to overflow," from in- "onto" (see in- (2)) + undare "to flow," from unda "wave" (see water).

inundate

v.

1620s, back-formation from inundation, or else from Latin inundatus, past participle of inundare "to overflow, run over" (see inundation). Related: Inundated; inundating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for inundate

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for inundation

11
15
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for inundation