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2017 Word of the Year

King Lear

[leer] /lɪər/
noun
1.
a tragedy (1606) by Shakespeare.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for King Lear
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • "Undo this button" is not necessarily a quotation from King Lear.

    The Creed of the Old South 1865-1915 Basil L. Gildersleeve
  • This same tendency shows itself in King Lear in other forms.

    Shakespearean Tragedy A. C. Bradley
  • This, if we like to use the word, is Shakespeare's 'pessimism' in King Lear.

    Shakespearean Tragedy A. C. Bradley
  • Then we can be no judges of tragic art, of King Lear or the Œdipus.

    Platform Monologues T. G. Tucker
  • Mr. Brown offered to accommodate us by etching this design, one of a series from “King Lear” which he had drawn in Paris in 1844.

    The Germ Various
  • Shakespeare has added interest to it by making it the password in the tragedy of "King Lear."

    A Garden with House Attached Sarah Warner Brooks
  • It's like King Lear throwing off his clothes in the storm because his daughters turned him out.

    The Prime Minister

    Anthony Trollope
King Lear in Culture

King Lear definition


A tragedy by William Shakespeare about an old king who unwisely hands his kingdom over to two of his daughters. The daughters, who had flattered Lear while he was in power, turn on him; their actions reduce him to poverty and eventually to madness. His youngest daughter, Cordelia, whom he had at first spurned, remains faithful to him.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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