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landmark

[land-mahrk]
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noun
  1. a prominent or conspicuous object on land that serves as a guide, especially to ships at sea or to travelers on a road; a distinguishing landscape feature marking a site or location: The post office served as a landmark for locating the street to turn down.
  2. something used to mark the boundary of land.
  3. a building or other place that is of outstanding historical, aesthetic, or cultural importance, often declared as such and given a special status (landmark designation), ordaining its preservation, by some authorizing organization.
  4. a significant or historic event, juncture, achievement, etc.: The court decision stands as a landmark in constitutional law.
verb (used with object)
  1. to declare (a building, site, etc.) a landmark: a movement to landmark New York's older theaters.

Origin of landmark

before 1000; Middle English; Old English landmearc. See land, mark1
Related formsun·land·marked, adjective

Synonyms

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4. milestone, watershed, benchmark.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

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British Dictionary definitions for landmarked

landmark

noun
  1. a prominent or well-known object in or feature of a particular landscape
  2. an important or unique decision, event, fact, discovery, etc
  3. a boundary marker or signpost
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for landmarked

landmark

n.

Old English landmearc, from land (n.) + mearc (see mark (n.1)). Originally "object set up to mark the boundaries of a kingdom, estate, etc.;" general sense of "conspicuous object in a landscape" is from 1560s. Modern figurative sense of "event, etc., considered a high point in history" is from 1859.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper