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2017 Word of the Year

largish

[lahr-jish] /ˈlɑr dʒɪʃ/
adjective
1.
rather large.
Origin of largish
1780-1790
First recorded in 1780-90; large + -ish1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for largish
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He had light hair, with largish whiskers, and he shaved his chin in harbour.

    A Voyage round the World W.H.G. Kingston
  • Yes in one way and another, there must be a largish sum sunk in "stock."

    Mushroom Town Oliver Onions
  • It made a largish bundle, but we did not intend to travel much.

  • On the twentieth day, however, we came to the banks of a largish river, the Gonooroo it was called.

    Maiwa's Revenge H. Rider Haggard
  • Thirty to forty pounds, or as much as fifty pounds, a week may easily go in hotel bills if there is a largish party.

    Yachting Vol. 1 Various.
  • Suddenly the hunter was pulled up in his reflections, as also in his stride, by a largish footprint in the snow.

    Boris the Bear-Hunter Fred Whishaw
  • He found himself in a largish room, brilliantly lit by the electric light, and triangular in shape.

    The Angel Cyril Arthur Edward Ranger Gull
  • He looked at Lenny Poe, a small, dark-haired man with a largish nose.

    The Foreign Hand Tie Gordon Randall Garrett
  • The former is a largish hand with some slight traces of Insular habits.

British Dictionary definitions for largish

largish

/ˈlɑːdʒɪʃ/
adjective
1.
fairly large
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Value for largish

11
12
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