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LASH

[lash] /læʃ/
noun
1.
an ocean-going vessel equipped with special cranes and holds for lifting and stowing cargo-carrying barges that can be sailed up inland waterways or into port facilities from offshore.
Origin of LASH
1960-1965
1960-65; l(ighter) a(board) sh(ip)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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British Dictionary definitions for lashs

lash1

/læʃ/
noun
1.
a sharp cutting blow from a whip or other flexible object: twenty lashes was his punishment
2.
the flexible end or ends of a whip
3.
a cutting or hurtful blow to the feelings, as one caused by ridicule or scolding
4.
a forceful beating or impact, as of wind, rain, or waves against something
5.
See eyelash
6.
(Austral & NZ, informal) have a lash, to make an attempt at or take part in (something)
verb (transitive)
7.
to hit (a person or thing) sharply with a whip, rope, etc, esp as a punishment
8.
(of rain, waves, etc) to beat forcefully against
9.
to attack with words, ridicule, etc
10.
to flick or wave sharply to and fro: the restless panther lashed his tail
11.
to urge or drive with or as if with a whip: to lash the audience into a violent mood
See also lash out
Derived Forms
lasher, noun
lashingly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: perhaps imitative

lash2

/læʃ/
verb
1.
(transitive) to bind or secure with rope, string, etc
Derived Forms
lasher, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Old French lachier, ultimately from Latin laqueāre to ensnare, from laqueus noose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for lashs

lash

n.

c.1300, las "a blow, a stroke," later "flexible part of a whip" (late 14c.), possibly imitative. The verb might be the source of the noun.

v.

"to strike with a whip," c.1300, "to deal a blow;" later "to whip" (late 14c.); see lash (n.). Lash out "to strike out violently" is from 1560s. Related: Lashed; lashing.

"bind," 1620s, originally nautical, from Middle French lachier, from Old French lacier "to lace" (see lace (v.)). Related: Lashed; lashing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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