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loris

[lawr-is, lohr-]
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noun, plural lo·ris.
  1. Also called slender loris. a small, slender, tailless, large-eyed, nocturnal lemur, Loris gracilis, of southern India and Sri Lanka.
  2. Also called slow loris. a similar but stockier lemur of the genus Nycticebus, of southeastern Asia: N. pygmaeus is a threatened species.
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Origin of loris

1765–75; < New Latin < Dutch loeris simpleton, equivalent to loer stupid person (< French lourd < Latin lūridus lurid) + -is -ish1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for loris

Historical Examples

  • “No use in that, Loris,” commented his god-mother, out 11 of his hearing.

    The Bondwoman

    Marah Ellis Ryan

  • Loris used his influence with the authorities to keep Joseph in durance.

    Rabbi and Priest

    Milton Goldsmith

  • She could only gaze into Loris' upturned face in mute despair.

    Rabbi and Priest

    Milton Goldsmith

  • With a cry of fury, he fell upon Loris and endeavored to tear him from his victim.

    Rabbi and Priest

    Milton Goldsmith

  • Loris was wounded in the side, but the ball striking a rib glanced off.

    Rabbi and Priest

    Milton Goldsmith


British Dictionary definitions for loris

loris

noun plural -ris
  1. any of several omnivorous nocturnal slow-moving prosimian primates of the family Lorisidae, of S and SE Asia, esp Loris tardigradus (slow loris) and Nycticebus coucang (slender loris), having vestigial digits and no tails
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Word Origin

C18: from French; of uncertain origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for loris

n.

small primate of Sri Lanka, 1774, from French loris (Buffon), of unknown origin, said to be from obsolete Dutch loeris "booby, clown."

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper