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lunge1

[luhnj] /lʌndʒ/
noun
1.
a sudden forward thrust, as with a sword or knife; stab.
2.
any sudden forward movement; plunge.
verb (used without object), lunged, lunging.
3.
to make a lunge or thrust; move with a lunge.
verb (used with object), lunged, lunging.
4.
to thrust (something) forward; cause to move with a lunge:
lunging his finger accusingly.
Origin of lunge1
1725-1735
1725-35; earlier longe for French allonge (noun; construed as a longe), allonger (v.) to lengthen, extend, deliver (blows) < Vulgar Latin *allongāre, for Late Latin ēlongāre to elongate
Can be confused
long, longe, lounge, lunge.
Synonyms
2. rush, charge, lurch.

lunge2

[luhnj] /lʌndʒ/
noun, verb, lunged, lunging.
1.
Origin
variant of longe < French; see longe, lune2
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for lunged
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • When I stepped back from the teller's window, Boris lunged against me and started to mumble something.

    El Diablo Brayton Norton
  • A low shriek came from the woman, and she lunged forward, the knife rising.

    Victory Lester del Rey
  • Up I sprang, fist at shoulder, and lunged at that fiendish visage with all the power of my body.

    A Maid of the Kentucky Hills Edwin Carlile Litsey
  • He lunged into the room, his arm tensed to strike, the hand not open but clenched.

  • Again they stumbled and lunged and tore their way through the shadowy woods.

    Frank Merriwell's Son Burt L. Standish
British Dictionary definitions for lunged

lunge1

/lʌndʒ/
noun
1.
a sudden forward motion
2.
(fencing) a thrust made by advancing the front foot and straightening the back leg, extending the sword arm forwards
verb
3.
to move or cause to move with a lunge
4.
(intransitive) (fencing) to make a lunge
Derived Forms
lunger, noun
Word Origin
C18: shortened form of obsolete C17 allonge, from French allonger to stretch out (one's arm), from Late Latin ēlongāre to lengthen. Compare elongate

lunge2

/lʌndʒ/
noun
1.
a rope used in training or exercising a horse
verb
2.
(transitive) to exercise or train (a horse) on a lunge
Word Origin
C17: from Old French longe, shortened from allonge, ultimately from Latin longuslong1; related to lunge1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for lunged

lunge

n.

1735, "a thrust with a sword," originally a fencing term, shortened from allonge, from French allonger "to extend, thrust," from Old French alongier "to lengthen, make long," from à "to" + Old French long, from Latin longus "long" (see long (adj.)).

v.

1735 (implied in lunged), from lunge (n.). Sense of "to make a sudden forward rush" is from 1821. Related: Lunged; lunging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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