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2017 Word of the Year

madcap

[mad-kap] /ˈmædˌkæp/
adjective
1.
wildly or heedlessly impulsive; reckless; rash:
a madcap scheme.
noun
2.
a madcap person.
Origin of madcap
1580-1590
First recorded in 1580-90; mad + cap1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for madcap
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Come down to breakfast, madcap, and come down lightly, or you'll wake your mother.

    Barnaby Rudge Charles Dickens
  • For once the madcap girl got the better of the practised courtier.

    Memoirs of the Comtesse du Barry Etienne Leon Lamothe-Langon
  • There was certainly no plan too madcap for Peachy to undertake.

  • We should have thought at once the prank that madcap would be at!

    Dorothy's Travels Evelyn Raymond
  • She wants instead a fortune‑teller, a madcap like Ydo Carrothers.

    The Silver Butterfly Mrs. Wilson Woodrow
British Dictionary definitions for madcap

madcap

/ˈmædˌkæp/
adjective
1.
impulsive, reckless, or lively
noun
2.
an impulsive, reckless, or lively person
Word Origin
C16: from mad + cap (in the figurative sense: head)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for madcap

1580s, noun and adjective, from mad (adj.) + cap, used here figuratively for "head." Related: Madcappery.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for madcap

13
16
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