Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

The Best Internet Slang

maim

[meym] /meɪm/
verb (used with object)
1.
to deprive of the use of some part of the body by wounding or the like; cripple:
The explosion maimed him for life.
2.
to impair; make essentially defective:
The essay was maimed by deletion of important paragraphs.
noun, Obsolete.
3.
a physical injury, especially a loss of a limb.
4.
an injury or defect; blemish; lack.
Origin of maim
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English mayme, variant of mahayme mayhem
Related forms
maimedness, noun
maimer, noun
remaim, verb (used with object)
self-maimed, adjective
unmaimed, adjective
Can be confused
maim, mayhem (see synonym study at the current entry)
Synonyms
1. Maim, lacerate, mangle, mutilate indicate the infliction of painful and severe injuries on the body. To maim is to injure by giving a disabling wound, or by depriving a person of one or more members or their use: maimed in an accident. To lacerate is to inflict severe cuts and tears on the flesh or skin: to lacerate an arm. To mangle is to chop undiscriminatingly or to crush or rend by blows or pressure, as if by machinery: bodies mangled in a train wreck. To mutilate is to injure the completeness or beauty of a body, especially by cutting off an important member: to mutilate a statue, a tree, a person. 2. injure, disable, deface, mar.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for maiming
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • As to whether they were killing or maiming Caradoc's crew, Madden could not tell.

    The Cruise of the Dry Dock T. S. Stribling
  • Indeed, obstinacy is one of his most maiming characteristics.

    Idling in Italy Joseph Collins
  • I am most thankful indeed for my escape from death or maiming.

  • The maiming of Lola's beauty has been the last jest which the Arch-Jester has practised on me.

    Simon the Jester William J. Locke
  • After supper Ted told of the maiming of the cattle and the death of Sol Flatbush.

    Ted Strong in Montana

    Edward C. Taylor
  • What reproach--what evil augury--nay, perhaps, what maiming of our enterprise!

    Sir Mortimer Mary Johnston
British Dictionary definitions for maiming

maim

/meɪm/
verb (transitive)
1.
to mutilate, cripple, or disable a part of the body of (a person or animal)
2.
to make defective
noun
3.
(obsolete) an injury or defect
Derived Forms
maimedness (ˈmeɪmɪdnɪs) noun
maimer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French mahaignier to wound, probably of Germanic origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for maiming

maim

v.

c.1300, maimen, from Old French mahaignier "injure, wound, muitilate, cripple, disarm," possibly from Vulgar Latin *mahanare (cf. Provençal mayanhar, Italian magagnare), of unknown origin; or possibly from a Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *mait- (cf. Old Norse meiða "to hurt," related to mad (adj.)), or from PIE root *mai- "to cut." Related: Maimed; maiming.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for maim

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for maiming

12
16
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for maiming