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Maytime

[mey-tahym] /ˈmeɪˌtaɪm/
noun
1.
the month of May.
Also called Maytide
[mey-tahyd] /ˈmeɪˌtaɪd/ (Show IPA)
.
Origin of Maytime
1795-1805
First recorded in 1795-1805; May + time
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for Maytime
Historical Examples
  • The great standard fluttered with the movements of the Maytime breeze.

    Joan of Arc Lucy Foster Madison
  • The day was full of sunshine and the river had a Maytime animation.

  • None would be there in Maytime, for the season for felling was long past.

    A Thane of Wessex

    Charles W. Whistler
  • As now, so during the lifetime of Mr. Cocke, Maytime at Hollins stirred a flutter of excitement in the student's mind.

    Charles Lewis Cocke William Robert Lee Smith
  • I saw no man, for once I had crossed the highroad none was likely to seek the heights in Maytime.

    A Thane of Wessex

    Charles W. Whistler
  • Then, suddenly, all our spring gladness and Maytime hopes were blighted as by a killing frost.

    The Golden Road Lucy Maud Montgomery
  • It was also to such men that the revelry of Christmastide, Maytime, and the like were most precious.

  • The air that poured in through the open windows was sweet and heavy with Maytime odors of blossoming and blooming.

    Back Home Irvin S. Cobb
  • It was Maytime, and there were roses everywhere—roses to sell and roses to give away.

    The Sunbonnet Babies in Italy Eulalie Osgood Grover
  • To them the coming examinations were constantly very important indeed—far more important than chestnut buds or Maytime hazes.

    Anne Of Green Gables Lucy Maud Montgomery

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