Try Our Apps
Dictionary.com

follow Dictionary.com

2017 Word of the Year

Midsummer Eve

noun, Chiefly British.
1.
the evening preceding Midsummer Day: formerly believed to be a time when witches and other supernatural beings caused widespread mischief.
Also called Midsummer Night, St. John's Eve, St. John's Night.
Origin of Midsummer Eve
late Middle English
1400-1450
late Middle English word dating back to 1400-50
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for Midsummer Eve
Historical Examples
  • And he remembered that it is only magic when you pluck it on Midsummer Eve.

    The Magic World Edith Nesbit
  • In Sweden divining-rods of mistletoe are cut on Midsummer Eve.

    The Sacred Tree J. H. Philpot
  • It meant nothing to him that Midsummer Eve was fast approaching.

    Little Erik of Sweden Madeline Brandeis
  • Never had the Maypole been so gayly decked as at sunset on Midsummer Eve.

    Twice Told Tales Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Never had the Maypole been so gayly decked as at sunset on Midsummer Eve.

    Twice-Told Tales Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • The gathering of a rose on Midsummer Eve was once superstitiously associated with the choice of a husband.

  • In the drawing called "Midsummer Eve" there is a mystery which is not merely the mystery of night and shadow.

    Imaginations and Reveries (A.E.) George William Russell
  • The Snake-stone is another striking Welsh tradition, associated with Midsummer Eve.

    British Goblins Wirt Sikes
  • A girl who sees nine bonfires on Midsummer Eve will marry before the year is out.

    Balder The Beautiful, Vol. I. Sir James George Frazer
  • All over Spain great bonfires called lumes are still lit on Midsummer Eve.

    Balder The Beautiful, Vol. I. Sir James George Frazer

Word of the Day

Nearby words for midsummer eve

Word Value for Midsummer

16
20
Scrabble Words With Friends