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90s Slang You Should Know

moil

[moil] /mɔɪl/
verb (used without object)
1.
to work hard; drudge.
2.
to whirl or churn ceaselessly; twist; eddy.
verb (used with object)
3.
Archaic. to wet or smear.
noun
4.
hard work or drudgery.
5.
confusion, turmoil, or trouble.
6.
Glassmaking. a superfluous piece of glass formed during blowing and removed in the finishing operation.
7.
Mining. a short hand tool with a polygonal point, used for breaking or prying out rock.
Origin of moil
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English moillen to make or get wet and muddy < Middle French moillier < Vulgar Latin *molliāre, derivative of Latin mollis soft
Related forms
moiler, noun
moilingly, adverb
unmoiled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for moil
Historical Examples
  • Ah, I do not wonder you love this morning hour, when beauty reigns supreme, before the toil and moil of the world has begun.

    Floyd Grandon's Honor Amanda Minnie Douglas
  • I'll juist tak' a leuk at the grave, moil, gin ye'll hae an ee on the dog.

    Greyfriars Bobby Eleanor Atkinson
  • Why, then, toil and moil for mere vanities that we must leave behind us?

  • And why should men toil and moil when they had been the masters of the world?

  • If Eugene is not a success amid the toil and moil of business, he shines out pre-eminently on such occasions as these.

    Floyd Grandon's Honor Amanda Minnie Douglas
  • There were people who were rich; people who did not have to toil and moil—people who lived in plenty.

    Wang the Ninth Putnam Weale
  • Blame them not, if for a time their limbs forget their toil and moil and their hearts their pangs and sorrows.

  • He had forgotten the calm and tranquil region that stretched beyond the moil and anguish of the strife for gain.

    Gordon Keith Thomas Nelson Page
  • For nearly two hours did they toil and moil over the narrow limits of that sea-girt rock—yet victory leaned to neither side.

    Erling the Bold R.M. Ballantyne
  • But moil not too much under ground; for the hope of mines is very uncertain, and useth to make the planters lazy, in other things.

    Essays Francis Bacon
British Dictionary definitions for moil

moil

/mɔɪl/
verb
1.
to moisten or soil or become moist, soiled, etc
2.
(intransitive) to toil or drudge (esp in the phrase toil and moil)
noun
3.
toil; drudgery
4.
confusion; turmoil
Derived Forms
moiler, noun
Word Origin
C14 (to moisten; later: to work hard in unpleasantly wet conditions) from Old French moillier, ultimately from Latin mollis soft
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for moil
v.

"to labour in the mire" [Johnson], c.1400, from Old French moillier "to wet, moisten" (12c., Modern French mouiller), from Vulgar Latin *molliare, from Latin mollis "soft," from PIE *mel- "soft" (see mild). Related: Moiled; moiling.

n.

"toil, labor," 1612, from moil (v.).

n.

"toil, labor," 1612, from moil (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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