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moil

[moil] /mɔɪl/
verb (used without object)
1.
to work hard; drudge.
2.
to whirl or churn ceaselessly; twist; eddy.
verb (used with object)
3.
Archaic. to wet or smear.
noun
4.
hard work or drudgery.
5.
confusion, turmoil, or trouble.
6.
Glassmaking. a superfluous piece of glass formed during blowing and removed in the finishing operation.
7.
Mining. a short hand tool with a polygonal point, used for breaking or prying out rock.
Origin of moil
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English moillen to make or get wet and muddy < Middle French moillier < Vulgar Latin *molliāre, derivative of Latin mollis soft
Related forms
moiler, noun
moilingly, adverb
unmoiled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for moiling
Historical Examples
  • Where the eager crowd is moiling, struggling on with weary tread!

    Rippling Rhymes

    Walt Mason
  • You'll have a little something to live on; and that's all I've done with my toiling and moiling.

    Sarah's School Friend

    May Baldwin
  • Like a plough-horse, I have always to be moiling and toiling.

    Madame Bovary Gustave Flaubert
  • And a whole army now toiling and moiling for him every night, for him the chief and master.

    The Bill-Toppers Andre Castaigne
  • Patriotism, racialism, unionism, had all been lost in a moiling megalopolitanism.

    This Crowded Earth Robert Bloch
  • I wonder if I am to go on all my life toiling and moiling for money?

    Wives and Daughters

    Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell
  • You can't go on at it always, toiling and moiling as you're doing now.

    Rachel Ray

    Anthony Trollope
  • The more they love their husbands, the less they like the idea of their toiling and moiling.

  • Thou camest of toiling and moiling, planning, digging, and stone-breaking.

    From the Oak to the Olive Julia Ward Howe
  • Give up your gold-hunting, and toiling and moiling after honor and glory, and copy us.

    Westward Ho! Charles Kingsley
British Dictionary definitions for moiling

moil

/mɔɪl/
verb
1.
to moisten or soil or become moist, soiled, etc
2.
(intransitive) to toil or drudge (esp in the phrase toil and moil)
noun
3.
toil; drudgery
4.
confusion; turmoil
Derived Forms
moiler, noun
Word Origin
C14 (to moisten; later: to work hard in unpleasantly wet conditions) from Old French moillier, ultimately from Latin mollis soft
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for moiling

moil

v.

"to labour in the mire" [Johnson], c.1400, from Old French moillier "to wet, moisten" (12c., Modern French mouiller), from Vulgar Latin *molliare, from Latin mollis "soft," from PIE *mel- "soft" (see mild). Related: Moiled; moiling.

moil

n.

"toil, labor," 1612, from moil (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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