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moody

[moo-dee] /ˈmu di/
adjective, moodier, moodiest.
1.
given to gloomy, depressed, or sullen moods; ill-humored.
2.
proceeding from or showing such a mood:
a moody silence.
3.
expressing or exhibiting sharply varying moods; temperamental.
Origin of moody
900
before 900; Middle English mody, Old English mōdig. See mood1, -y1
Related forms
moodily, adverb
moodiness, noun
unmoody, adjective
Synonyms
1. sulky, morose, brooding; glowering.

Moody

[moo-dee] /ˈmu di/
noun
1.
Dwight Lyman
[lahy-muh n] /ˈlaɪ mən/ (Show IPA),
1837–99, U.S. evangelist.
2.
Helen Wills, Wills, Helen Newington.
3.
William Vaughn
[vawn] /vɔn/ (Show IPA),
1869–1910, U.S. poet and playwright.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for moody
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • “You are too transcendental for me,” growled Ossipon, with moody concern.

    The Secret Agent Joseph Conrad
  • A solitary ruffian, indeed, is moody, but a gang of ruffians are jovial.

    Night and Morning, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • The premier and some of his colleagues observed, however, a moody silence.

    Alice, or The Mysteries, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  • He was silent and moody, and almost gruff on some occasions.

    One Day's Courtship Robert Barr
  • But what he had just witnessed plunged his thoughts into a moody channel.

    The Night Riders Ridgwell Cullum
British Dictionary definitions for moody

moody

/ˈmuːdɪ/
adjective moodier, moodiest
1.
sullen, sulky, or gloomy
2.
temperamental or changeable
Derived Forms
moodily, adverb
moodiness, noun

Moody

/ˈmuːdɪ/
noun
1.
Dwight Lyman. 1837–99, US evangelist and hymnodist, noted for his revivalist campaigns in Britain and the US with I. D. Sankey
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for moody
adj.

Old English modig "brave, proud, high-spirited, impetuous, arrogant," from Proto-Germanic *modago- (cf. Old Saxon modag, Dutch moedig, German mutig, Old Norse moðugr); see mood (1) + -y (2). Meaning "subject to gloomy spells" is first recorded 1590s (via a Middle English sense of "angry").

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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moody in Medicine

moody mood·y (mōō'dē)
adj. mood·i·er, mood·i·est

  1. Given to frequent changes of mood; temperamental.

  2. Subject to periods of depression; sulky.

  3. Expressive of a mood, especially a sullen or gloomy mood.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Word Value for moody

11
11
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