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Morse code

noun
1.
either of two systems of clicks and pauses, short and long sounds, or flashes of light, used to represent the letters of the alphabet, numerals, etc.: now used primarily in radiotelegraphy by ham operators.
Also called Morse alphabet.
Origin of Morse code
1830-1840
First recorded in 1830-40; after S. F. B. Morse
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for Morse code
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Delaney opened the door after a repeated knock in Morse code.

    Whispering Wires Henry Leverage
  • "You never can tell who knows the Morse code and who doesn't," Gilbert said.

    Tom Slade's Double Dare Percy Keese Fitzhugh
  • A red light indicates a dot in the Morse code and a white light indicates a dash.

    Artificial Light M. Luckiesh
  • There came again the faint tapping of some one at the other end of the line, signaling a message in the Morse code.

    Within the Law Marvin Dana
  • Inasmuch as there are no letters in the Chinese language, the difficulties in using the Morse code of telegraphy are very great.

    Commercial Geography Jacques W. Redway
  • The alphabet of signals employed is the 'Morse code,' so generally in vogue throughout the world.

  • I guess he went on kind of crazy, but he said he was sure because he knew the Morse code.

    Roy Blakeley Percy Keese Fitzhugh
  • He walked in dots and dashes like a Morse code out of the room, bestowing a naval salute on the Major as he passed.

    Miss Mapp Edward Frederic Benson
  • The signals were the short and long, or 'dots' and 'dashes' of the Morse code.

British Dictionary definitions for Morse code

Morse code

noun
1.
a telegraph code formerly used internationally for transmitting messages; it was superseded by satellite technology (the Global Marine Distress and Safety System) in 1999. Letters, numbers, etc, are represented by groups of shorter dots and longer dashes, or by groups of the corresponding sounds, dits and dahs, the groups being separated by spaces Also called international Morse code
Word Origin
C19: named after Samuel Morse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Morse code
n.

1867, earlier Morse key (1858), in honor of Samuel F.B. Morse (1791-1872), U.S. inventor who produced a system of telegraphic communication 1836. He invented both the recording telegraph and the alphabet of dots and dashes.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Morse code in Science
Morse code  
A code developed by Samuel Morse used for transmitting messages in which letters of the alphabet and numbers are represented by various sequences of written dots and dashes, or short and long signals such as electric tones or voltages. Morse code was used extensively in telegraphy. In a format that has been standardized for international use, it is still sometimes used for long distance radio communication.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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8
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