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naumachia

[naw-mey-kee-uh] /nɔˈmeɪ ki ə/
noun, plural naumachiae
[naw-mey-kee-ee] /nɔˈmeɪ kiˌi/ (Show IPA),
naumachias.
1.
a mock sea fight, given as a spectacle among the ancient Romans.
2.
a place for presenting such spectacles.
Origin of naumachia
1590-1600
1590-1600; < Latin: mock naval battle < Greek naumachía a sea fight, equivalent to naû(s) ship + mách(ē) battle, fight + -ia -ia
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for naumachia
Historical Examples
  • After the naumachia, the moon rose, and the Chinese lanterns were lighted.

  • In a naumachia given by Nero, there were sea-monsters swimming about in the artificial lake.

  • Sometimes the vast arena was flooded with water, and naumachia or sea-fights were exhibited.

    Valeria William Henry Withrow
  • The main street itself was in many parts filled completely, and around the naumachia Augusta great heaps were piled up.

    Quo Vadis Henryk Sienkiewicz
  • Another form of the spectacle for the entertainment of the Roman public was the naumachia, or naval battle.

    The Historical Child Oscar Chrisman
British Dictionary definitions for naumachia

naumachia

/nɔːˈmeɪkɪə/
noun (in ancient Rome) (pl) -chiae (-kɪˌiː), -chias, -chies
1.
a mock sea fight performed as an entertainment
2.
an artificial lake used in such a spectacle
Word Origin
C16: via Latin from Greek naumakhia, from naus ship + makhē battle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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