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2017 Word of the Year

nonchalance

[non-shuh-lahns, non-shuh-lahns, -luh ns] /ˌnɒn ʃəˈlɑns, ˈnɒn ʃəˌlɑns, -ləns/
noun
1.
the state or quality of being nonchalant; cool indifference or lack of concern; casualness.
Origin of nonchalance
1670-1680
From French, dating back to 1670-80; See origin at nonchalant, -ance
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for nonchalance
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • "Naturally," I said with nonchalance, though my quick temper was fired.

    The Bacillus of Beauty Harriet Stark
  • "Oh, yes," assented Kirkwood, with a nonchalance not entirely unassumed.

    The Black Bag Louis Joseph Vance
  • This was all said with a sort of nonchalance, which Corny did not at all like.

  • His nonchalance, I believe, was forced and meant to cover uneasiness.

    Heather and Snow George MacDonald
  • The elder lady spoke with the nonchalance of one quite used to the process.

    A Tangled Tale Lewis Carroll
  • His father courteously tried to make amends for his nonchalance.

    A Tangled Tale Lewis Carroll
  • He shrugged and produced his snuff-box with an offensive simulation of nonchalance.

    The Lion's Skin Rafael Sabatini
Word Origin and History for nonchalance
n.

1670s, from French nonchalance (13c.), from nonchalant (see nonchalant).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for nonchalance

18
23
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