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nurture

[nur-cher] /ˈnɜr tʃər/
verb (used with object), nurtured, nurturing.
1.
to feed and protect:
to nurture one's offspring.
2.
to support and encourage, as during the period of training or development; foster:
to nurture promising musicians.
3.
to bring up; train; educate.
noun
4.
rearing, upbringing, training, education, or the like.
5.
development:
the nurture of young artists.
6.
something that nourishes; nourishment; food.
Origin of nurture
1300-1350
1300-50; (noun) Middle English norture < Middle French, variant of nourriture < Late Latin nūtrītūra a nourishing, equivalent to Latin nūtrīt(us) (past participle of nūtrīre to feed, nourish) + -ūra -ure; (v.) derivative of the noun
Related forms
nurturable, adjective
nurtureless, adjective
nurturer, noun
unnurtured, adjective
well-nurtured, adjective
Synonyms
1, 3. See nurse.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for nurtured
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • War is seen to be but a symptom, a horrible outbreak of malignant forces, which we have nurtured and harboured in times of peace.

    Mountain Meditations L. Lind-af-Hageby
  • He had lived with it, nurtured it, clipped it, groomed it—for thirty-two years.

    The Friendly Road (AKA David Grayson) Ray Stannard Baker
  • Not induced or fed or nurtured by any political interests, with a capital P, on behalf of any group?

    Warren Commission (9 of 26): Hearings Vol. IX (of 15) The President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy
  • Harold ran off at once, true to the stern system of discipline in which he had been nurtured.

    Dream Days Kenneth Grahame
  • It had been engendered, nurtured, and matured by the mode of life she had been compelled to adopt.

    The Mysteries of London, v. 1/4 George W. M. Reynolds
British Dictionary definitions for nurtured

nurture

/ˈnɜːtʃə/
noun
1.
the act or process of promoting the development, etc, of a child
2.
something that nourishes
3.
(biology) the environmental factors that partly determine the structure of an organism See also nature (sense 12)
verb (transitive)
4.
to feed or support
5.
to educate or train
Derived Forms
nurturable, adjective
nurturer, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French norriture, from Latin nutrīre to nourish
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for nurtured

nurture

n.

c.1300, "breeding, upbringing," from Old French norture, nourreture "food, nourishment; education, training," from Late Latin nutritia (see nursery).

v.

"to feed or nourish," early 15c., from nurture (n.). Related: Nurtured; nurturing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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9
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