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oblate1

[ob-leyt, o-bleyt] /ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt/
adjective
1.
flattened at the poles, as a spheroid generated by the revolution of an ellipse about its shorter axis (opposed to prolate).
Origin of oblate1
1695-1705
1695-1705; < New Latin oblātus lengthened, equivalent to Latin ob- ob- + (prō)lātus prolate
Related forms
oblately, adverb

oblate2

[ob-leyt, o-bleyt] /ˈɒb leɪt, ɒˈbleɪt/
noun
1.
a person offered to the service of and living in a monastery, but not under monastic vows or full monastic rule.
2.
a lay member of any of various Roman Catholic societies devoted to special religious work.
Origin
1860-65; < Medieval Latin oblātus, suppletive past participle of offerre to offer
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for oblate
Historical Examples
  • "We will go for a walk to-day," said the oblate, rubbing his hands.

    En Route

    J.-K. (Joris-Karl) Huysmans
  • "Such, in few words, is the history of the convent," said the oblate.

    En Route

    J.-K. (Joris-Karl) Huysmans
  • "That means they are going to kill him soon," said the oblate.

    En Route

    J.-K. (Joris-Karl) Huysmans
  • "And this proves that your conversion is good," affirmed the oblate.

    En Route

    J.-K. (Joris-Karl) Huysmans
  • The form of our globe, which is that of an oblate spheroid with an ellipticity of about 1⁄299.

    The Sailor's Word-Book William Henry Smyth
  • For any other figure, such as an oblate spheroid, this is not exactly true.

    Pioneers of Science Oliver Lodge
  • For anyone except the trailer after strange souls The oblate is an affliction.

    Egoists James Huneker
  • Newton proved that this was due to the fact that the earth is an oblate spheroid.

    Nautical Charts G. R. Putnam
  • Fruit, medium sized; roundish and flattened, inclining to oblate.

    British Pomology Robert Hogg
  • Fruit, medium sized; oblate, regularly and handsomely shaped.

    British Pomology Robert Hogg
British Dictionary definitions for oblate

oblate1

/ˈɒbleɪt/
adjective
1.
having an equatorial diameter of greater length than the polar diameter: the earth is an oblate sphere Compare prolate
Derived Forms
oblately, adverb
Word Origin
C18: from New Latin oblātus lengthened, from Latin ob- towards + lātus, past participle of ferre to bring

oblate2

/ˈɒbleɪt/
noun
1.
a person dedicated to a monastic or religious life
Word Origin
C19: from French oblat, from Medieval Latin oblātus, from Latin offerre to offer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for oblate
adj.

"flattened on the ends," 1705, from Medieval Latin oblatus "flattened," from Latin ob "toward" (see ob-) + latus, abstracted from its opposite, prolatus "lengthened" (see oblate (n.)).

n.

"person devoted to religious work," 1756, from Medieval Latin oblatus, noun use of Latin oblatus, variant past participle of offerre "to offer, to bring before," from ob- (see ob-) + latus "carried, borne" (used as suppletive past participle of ferre "to bear"), from *tlatos, from PIE root *tel-, *tol- "to bear, carry" (see extol).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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