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off-shore

adj.

also off shore, 1720, from off + shore (n.). American English use for "other than the U.S." is from 1948 and the Marshall Plan.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Examples from the Web for off-shore
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Historical Examples
  • On closing the land again, we regained the off-shore wind, and bright weather.

    In the Arctic Seas Francis Leopold McClintock
  • Once clear of it the jib was hoisted, and she began to glide out of the harbor before a gentle, off-shore breeze.

  • "But he had no doings with the off-shore wind," Opee-Kwan retorted.

    Children of the Frost Jack London
  • An hour later we examined the off-shore and found the dead female among the sedges.

  • off-shore, the Trade-breeze was fresh, but in the bay the rocks broke the sea.

    Kit Musgrave's Luck Harold Bindloss
  • The most striking features of the off-shore islands is that they are islands of ice rather than of earth.

    The New North Agnes Deans Cameron
  • Noon saw us lying to, on the off-shore tack, under a goose-winged maintopsail and storm staysails.

    There She Blows! William Hussey Macy
  • Terry bent over his task again while the Esperance sped along over the off-shore swells.

    Creatures of the Abyss Murray Leinster

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