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2017 Word of the Year

offal

[aw-fuh l, of-uh l] /ˈɔ fəl, ˈɒf əl/
noun
1.
the parts of a butchered animal that are considered inedible by human beings; carrion.
2.
the parts of a butchered animal removed in dressing; viscera.
3.
refuse; rubbish; garbage.
Origin of offal
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English, equivalent to of off + fal fall; compare Dutch afval
Can be confused
awful, awesome, offal (see usage note at awful)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for offal
Contemporary Examples
  • This is the home base of the "King of offal," Chris Cosentino.

    Fresh Picks Eli Kirshtein February 23, 2010
  • Incanto is the home base of the “King of offal,” who is known for cooking any part of any animal.

    Fresh Picks Eli Kirshtein February 23, 2010
Historical Examples
  • offal and carrion were strewn all about the place; it swarmed with flies.

    When the West Was Young Frederick R. Bechdolt
  • Wherever I turned the place was saturated with the blood of fish and offal.

    The Land of the Long Night Paul du Chaillu
  • I have seen Mary contending with the pigs for the offal thrown into the street.

  • I have seen poor Mary contending for the offal, with the pigs in the street.

    My Bondage and My Freedom Frederick Douglass
  • They dropped and died on the dust-heaps they had been rummaging for offal.

    The Dop Doctor

    Clotilde Inez Mary Graves
  • Like a wise trapper, he put aside the offal to serve as bait for the traps.

    Kiddie the Scout

    Robert Leighton
  • He was crouching near François, watching for the offal of the birds.

    The Boy Hunters Captain Mayne Reid
  • By day they prowled around the camp, and fought with the dogs for the offal and the bones.

    The Madigans Miriam Michelson
British Dictionary definitions for offal

offal

/ˈɒfəl/
noun
1.
the edible internal parts of an animal, such as the heart, liver, and tongue
2.
dead or decomposing organic matter
3.
refuse; rubbish
Word Origin
C14: from off + fall, referring to parts fallen or cut off; compare German Abfall rubbish
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for offal
n.

late 14c., "waste parts, refuse," from off + fall (v.); the notion being that which "falls off" the butcher's block; perhaps a translation of Middle Dutch afval.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Nearby words for offal

Word Value for offal

11
12
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