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pons asinorum

[as-uh-nawr-uh m, -nohr-] /ˌæs əˈnɔr əm, -ˈnoʊr-/
noun
1.
a geometric proposition that if a triangle has two of its sides equal, the angles opposite these sides are also equal: so named from the difficulty experienced by beginners in mastering it. Euclid, 1:5.
Origin of pons asinorum
1745-1755
First recorded in 1745-55, pons asinorum is from the Latin word pōns asinōrum bridge of asses
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for pons asinorum
Historical Examples
  • The bridge of stability is therefore not even a pons asinorum.

  • The goal of Socialism, so far as it relates to this pons asinorum of shortening hours, is simply the right to loaf.

    The New Society Walther Rathenau
  • Who knows but what I may die a glorious death under the pons asinorum after all?

  • This proposition has long been called the pons asinorum, or bridge of asses, but no one knows where or when the name arose.

    The Teaching of Geometry David Eugene Smith
  • The paradox of predication, that it seems to deny identity, or to deny difference, becomes a pons asinorum.

  • Ay, there is the pons asinorum, the bridge whereon young asses and old fools come to such terrible grief.

    Mr. Isaacs F. Marion Crawford
  • We will sit with our arms round each other's waists on the pons asinorum, and see the stream of mathematics flow beneath.

    Roundabout Papers William Makepeace Thackeray
  • Thats as easy as pons asinorum to say, but not so easy to do, commented number six—Billie Burden.

    The Eight-Oared Victors

    Lester Chadwick
  • Your lordship's acute intellect has comprehended my pons asinorum with great intelligence.

  • The story is told that one of his pupils, arrived perhaps at the pons asinorum, asked, "What do I get by learning these things?"

British Dictionary definitions for pons asinorum

pons asinorum

/ˌæsɪˈnɔːrəm/
noun
1.
the geometric proposition that the angles opposite the two equal sides of an isosceles triangle are equal
Word Origin
Latin: bridge of asses, referring originally to the fifth proposition of the first book of Euclid, which was considered difficult for students to learn
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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