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2017 Word of the Year

precognition

[pree-kog-nish-uh n] /ˌpri kɒgˈnɪʃ ən/
noun
1.
knowledge of a future event or situation, especially through extrasensory means.
2.
Scots Law.
  1. the examination of witnesses and other parties before a trial in order to supply a legal ground for prosecution.
  2. the evidence established in such an examination.
Origin of precognition
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English < Late Latin praecognitiōn-, s. of praecognitiō; see pre-, cognition
Related forms
precognitive
[pree-kog-ni-tiv] /priˈkɒg nɪ tɪv/ (Show IPA),
adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for precognition
Historical Examples
  • Would you consider a person fortunate to possess the power of precognition?

    Card Trick Walter Bupp AKA Randall Garrett
  • What she had said about expecting to find me on the roof sounded like precognition.

    Vigorish Gordon Randall Garrett
  • precognition is the least understood of the Psi powers, and the most erratic.

    Vigorish Gordon Randall Garrett
  • "I'm telling him the facts of life about precognition," Morgan told her.

    Talents, Incorporated William Fitzgerald Jenkins
  • It might be that there was such a thing as precognition in the form Morgan had described.

    Talents, Incorporated William Fitzgerald Jenkins
  • That precognition about me, it doesn't include Madame Porvis?

    Talents, Incorporated William Fitzgerald Jenkins
  • Howsever, I suppose thats to be considered in the precognition!

    The Entail

    John Galt
  • Malone wondered if, just maybe, his precognition had blown a fuse.

    Occasion for Disaster Gordon Randall Garrett
  • "But I saw no harm in seeing what she is like with precognition," I said.

    The Right Time Walter Bupp
  • To mention two important types only—there were apparitions of the so-called dead, and there were cases of precognition.

British Dictionary definitions for precognition

precognition

/ˌpriːkɒɡˈnɪʃən/
noun
1.
(psychol) the alleged ability to foresee future events See also clairvoyance, clairaudience
Derived Forms
precognitive (priːˈkɒɡnɪtɪv) adjective
Word Origin
C17: from Late Latin praecognitiō foreknowledge, from praecognoscere to foresee, from prae before + cognoscere to know, ascertain
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for precognition
n.

"foreknowledge," mid-15c., from Late Latin praecognitionem (nom. praecognitio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin praecognoscere "to foreknow," from prae "before" (see pre-) + cognoscere "to know" (see cognizance).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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precognition in Medicine

precognition pre·cog·ni·tion (prē'kŏg-nĭsh'ən)
n.
Knowledge of something in advance of its occurrence, especially by extrasensory perception.


pre·cog'ni·tive adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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