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precognition

[pree-kog-nish-uh n]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. knowledge of a future event or situation, especially through extrasensory means.
  2. Scots Law.
    1. the examination of witnesses and other parties before a trial in order to supply a legal ground for prosecution.
    2. the evidence established in such an examination.

Origin of precognition

1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin praecognitiōn-, s. of praecognitiō; see pre-, cognition
Related formspre·cog·ni·tive [pree-kog-ni-tiv] /priˈkɒg nɪ tɪv/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for precognition

Historical Examples

  • Would you consider a person fortunate to possess the power of precognition?

    Card Trick

    Walter Bupp AKA Randall Garrett

  • What she had said about expecting to find me on the roof sounded like precognition.

    Vigorish

    Gordon Randall Garrett

  • Precognition is the least understood of the Psi powers, and the most erratic.

    Vigorish

    Gordon Randall Garrett

  • "I'm telling him the facts of life about precognition," Morgan told her.

    Talents, Incorporated

    William Fitzgerald Jenkins

  • It might be that there was such a thing as precognition in the form Morgan had described.

    Talents, Incorporated

    William Fitzgerald Jenkins


British Dictionary definitions for precognition

precognition

noun
  1. psychol the alleged ability to foresee future eventsSee also clairvoyance, clairaudience
Derived Formsprecognitive (priːˈkɒɡnɪtɪv), adjective

Word Origin

C17: from Late Latin praecognitiō foreknowledge, from praecognoscere to foresee, from prae before + cognoscere to know, ascertain
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for precognition

n.

"foreknowledge," mid-15c., from Late Latin praecognitionem (nom. praecognitio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin praecognoscere "to foreknow," from prae "before" (see pre-) + cognoscere "to know" (see cognizance).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

precognition in Medicine

precognition

([object Object])
n.
  1. Knowledge of something in advance of its occurrence, especially by extrasensory perception.
Related formspre•cogni•tive adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

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