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prosody

[pros-uh-dee] /ˈprɒs ə di/
noun
1.
the science or study of poetic meters and versification.
2.
a particular or distinctive system of metrics and versification:
Milton's prosody.
3.
Linguistics. the stress and intonation patterns of an utterance.
Origin of prosody
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English < Latin prosōdia < Greek prosōidía tone or accent, modulation of voice, song sung to music, equivalent to prós toward + ōid(ḗ) ode + -ia -y3
Related forms
prosodic
[pruh-sod-ik] /prəˈsɒd ɪk/ (Show IPA),
prosodical, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for prosody
Historical Examples
  • You are under no earthly obligation to Messrs. Syntax and prosody.

    The Emigrants Of Ahadarra William Carleton
  • prosody, the song of angels, and no earthly or inglorious theme.

  • Besides, there are a great many lines to be considered in the second part of prosody, which treats of Versification.

  • As there is in Arithmetic a long division and a short division, so in prosody is Quantity considered as long or short.

  • However—the prosody and Serpent lectures are just finishing off and then I shall come to see you in the morning!

    Hortus Inclusus John Ruskin
  • prosody deals with metre; and with accent, quantity and the articulate sounds, as subordinate to metre.

    The English Language Robert Gordon Latham
  • It is common for those that deliver the grammar of modern languages, to omit the prosody.

  • But we are not yet come to the prosody; nor shall we arrive there very soon unless we get on with the Syntax.

    The Comic Latin Grammar Percival Leigh
  • As Comparative Anatomy teaches what the sound of a cod-fish is; so prosody teaches what is the sound of syllables.

    The Comic Latin Grammar Percival Leigh
  • There is a river in Macedon and a river in Monmouth: in like manner there are positions in dancing and positions in prosody.

    The Comic Latin Grammar Percival Leigh
British Dictionary definitions for prosody

prosody

/ˈprɒsədɪ/
noun
1.
the study of poetic metre and of the art of versification, including rhyme, stanzaic forms, and the quantity and stress of syllables
2.
a system of versification
3.
the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
Derived Forms
prosodic (prəˈsɒdɪk) adjective
prosodist, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin prosōdia accent of a syllable, from Greek prosōidia song set to music, from pros towards + ōidē, from aoidē song; see ode
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for prosody
n.

late 15c., from Latin prosodia "accent of a syllable," from Greek prosoidia "song sung to music," also "accent, modulation," literally "a singing in addition to," from pros "to, forward, near" + oide "song, poem" (see ode). Related: Prosodiacal; prosodist.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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