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pudgy

[puhj-ee]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
adjective, pudg·i·er, pudg·i·est.
  1. short and fat or thick: an infant's pudgy fingers.
Also especially British, podgy.

Origin of pudgy

First recorded in 1830–40; origin uncertain
Related formspudg·i·ly, adverbpudg·i·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for pudgy

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • And she laughed and laughed, slapping her fat knee with a pudgy, ring-laden hand.

    Athalie

    Robert W. Chambers

  • His pudgy fingers trembled about the pen as he scratched on the pad before him.

    El Diablo

    Brayton Norton

  • She had a little baby, a new one, a pudgy red-looking thing.

  • There was an odd expression of defiance overlaid with fear on his pudgy features.

    The Lani People

    J. F. Bone

  • In the middle of the room stood the Elf, with pudgy hand extended.

    The Shadow Witch

    Gertrude Crownfield


British Dictionary definitions for pudgy

pudgy

adjective pudgier or pudgiest
  1. a variant spelling (esp US) of podgy
Derived Formspudgily, adverbpudginess, noun

Word Origin

C19: of uncertain origin; compare earlier pudsy plump, perhaps from Scottish pud stomach, plump child
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pudgy

adj.

also podgy, 1824, from colloquial pudge "anything short and thick" + -y (2). Perhaps related to pudsy "plump" (1754), possibly a diminutive of nursery word pud "hand, forepaw" (from 17c.). A connection with pudding also has been conjectured. In late 19c. often on lists of English local or dialectal words; sources also mention puddy, punchy, pluggy, pudget as relatives or variants. Related: Pudginess.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper