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recitation

[res-i-tey-shuh n] /ˌrɛs ɪˈteɪ ʃən/
noun
1.
an act of reciting.
2.
a reciting or repeating of something from memory, especially formally or publicly.
3.
oral response by a pupil or pupils to a teacher on a prepared lesson.
4.
a period of classroom instruction.
5.
an elocutionary delivery of a piece of poetry or prose, without the text, before an audience.
6.
a piece so delivered or for such delivery.
Origin of recitation
1475-1485
1475-85; < Latin recitātiōn- (stem of recitātiō), equivalent to recitāt(us) (past participle of recitāre to recite) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
nonrecitation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for recitation
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • That done, the class took up the double task of recitation joined to that of gesture.

    Unwritten Literature of Hawaii Nathaniel Bright Emerson
  • The good black things referred to in the recitation are the bears.

  • On ‘the recitation of the required dizaine,’ a partial indulgence promptly follows.

    An Inland Voyage Robert Louis Stevenson
  • But, as if he were unaware of what had happened, Dante went on with his recitation of the poem.

    The God of Love Justin Huntly McCarthy
  • Parents object to every lesson out of school, so the whole period of preparation and recitation is pressed into the school-hours.

    The Education of American Girls Anna Callender Brackett
  • Use them for conversation subjects and then for reading or recitation.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 10 Charles Herbert Sylvester
  • As a test of the degree of understanding, the recitation method serves admirably.

    Public Speaking Clarence Stratton
  • You can easily do it, because you haven't a recitation at this hour.

    Marjorie Dean Pauline Lester
British Dictionary definitions for recitation

recitation

/ˌrɛsɪˈteɪʃən/
noun
1.
the act of reciting from memory, or a formal reading of verse before an audience
2.
something recited
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for recitation
n.

late 15c., "act of detailing," from Old French récitation (14c.) and directly from Latin recitationem (nominative recitatio) "public reading, a reading aloud," noun of action from past participle stem of recitare (see recite). Meaning "act of repeating aloud" is from 1620s; that of "repetition of a prepared lesson" is first recorded 1770, American English.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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12
14
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