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recur

[ri-kur] /rɪˈkɜr/
verb (used without object), recurred, recurring.
1.
to occur again, as an event, experience, etc.
2.
to return to the mind:
The idea kept recurring.
3.
to come up again for consideration, as a question.
4.
to have recourse.
Origin of recur
1610-1620
1610-20; earlier: to recede < Latin recurrere to run back, equivalent to re- re- + currere to run
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for recur
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I recur to it here as a plausible suggestion only, in connection with my theme.

    'Tis Sixty Years Since Charles Francis Adams
  • I trust that you will not be offended if I recur to the subject of the New House.

    Vivian Grey Earl of Beaconsfield, Benjamin Disraeli
  • Pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions may or rather must recur in successive lines.

    Cratylus Plato
  • Mark my words, there will soon be a new phase or an old one will recur.

  • It is most likely that the court will not recur to capital punishment again.

  • A reflection I had reason to recur to more than once in my after experience of Ireland.

    Jack Hinton Charles James Lever
British Dictionary definitions for recur

recur

/rɪˈkɜː/
verb (intransitive) -curs, -curring, -curred
1.
to happen again, esp at regular intervals
2.
(of a thought, idea, etc) to come back to the mind
3.
(of a problem, etc) to come up again
4.
(maths) (of a digit or group of digits) to be repeated an infinite number of times at the end of a decimal fraction
Derived Forms
recurring, adjective
recurringly, adverb
Word Origin
C15: from Latin recurrere, from re- + currere to run
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for recur
v.

late 14c., "recover from illness or suffering;" mid-15c., "to return" (to a place), from Latin recurrere "to return, run back, hasten back," figuratively "revert, recur," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + currere "to run" (see current (adj.)). Originally of persons; application to thoughts, ideas, etc. is recorded from 1620s. Meaning "happen again" is from 1670s. Related: Recurred; recurring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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recur in Medicine

recur re·cur (rĭ-kûr')
v. re·curred, re·cur·ring, re·curs

  1. To happen, come up, or show up again or repeatedly.

  2. To return to one's attention or memory.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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