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relative clause

noun
1.
a subordinate clause introduced by a relative pronoun, adjective, or adverb, either expressed or deleted, especially such a clause modifying an antecedent, as who saw you in He's the man who saw you or (that) I wrote in Here's the letter (that) I wrote.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for relative clause
Historical Examples
  • Antecedent—That to which a relative pronoun or a relative clause refers.

    Punctuation Frederick W. Hamilton
  • The relative clause must be used to understand the sentence.

    Business English

    Rose Buhlig
  • Note the relative clause where in English the participle would be used.

    Contes Franais Douglas Labaree Buffum
  • The antecedent is often incorporated in the relative clause.

    New Latin Grammar Charles E. Bennett
  • Note the abnormal position of the verb in the relative clause, a construction more frequently met with now than formerly.

    Aus meinem Knigreich Carmen Sylva
  • Between a main clause and a relative clause, and or but thwarts subordination.

  • The relative clause confines or restricts the meaning of the antecedent (Italian).

  • For your images is evidently described by the relative clause which you have made, and ought to stand next it.

  • It is best to class the relative clause as one of Characteristic, unless the result idea is clear and unmistakable.

    New Latin Grammar Charles E. Bennett
  • If a relative clause or participial expression sounds awkward make a separate sentence of it.

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