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riffle

[rif-uh l] /ˈrɪf əl/
verb (used with or without object), riffled, riffling.
1.
to turn hastily; flutter and shift:
to riffle a stack of letters; to riffle through a book.
2.
Cards. to shuffle by dividing the deck in two, raising the corners slightly, and allowing them to fall alternately together.
3.
to cause or become a riffle.
noun
4.
a rapid, as in a stream.
5.
a ripple, as upon the surface of water.
6.
Mining. the lining of transverse bars or slats on the bed of a sluice, arranged so as to catch heavy minerals, as gold or platinum.
7.
a hopper for distributing bulk material.
8.
the act or method of riffling cards.
Origin of riffle
1630-1640
1630-40; blend of ripple1 and ruffle1
Related forms
unriffled, adjective
Can be confused
riffle, rifle.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for riffle
Historical Examples
  • Then I saw a fire over here, and just managed to make the riffle.

  • "I'll back my boys to make the riffle," confidently asserted Roque.

  • At the bottom of each ledge is a riffle to arrest the particles of gold.

    Getting Gold J. C. F. Johnson
  • In the third riffle, seven cards have to be held up, and in the fourth, ten.

    Sharps and Flats John Nevil Maskelyne
  • riffle—A groove or strip to catch gold and mercury in a sluice.

    The A B C of Mining Charles A. Bramble
  • I'll go in just below the riffle and explore the cellar-hole!

    The Hero of Manila Rossiter Johnson
  • Only too often, in fact, it will be drawn in despite every effort to avoid the riffle.

    Down the Yellowstone Lewis R. Freeman
  • One can drift a riffle stern first that is too rough to ride any other way.

    Down the Yellowstone Lewis R. Freeman
  • We had to cross a rapid river at a riffle where the motor-cars were just able to make it.

  • We took my remuda, the spades and axes, and started for the riffle.

    The Outlet Andy Adams
British Dictionary definitions for riffle

riffle

/ˈrɪfəl/
verb
1.
when intr, often foll by through. to flick rapidly through (the pages of a book, magazine, etc), esp in a desultory manner
2.
to shuffle (playing cards) by halving the pack and flicking the adjacent corners together
3.
to make or become a riffle
noun
4.
(US & Canadian)
  1. a rapid in a stream
  2. a rocky shoal causing a rapid
  3. a ripple on water
5.
(mining) a contrivance on the bottom of a sluice, containing transverse grooves for trapping particles of gold
6.
the act or an instance of riffling
Word Origin
C18: probably from ruffle1, influenced by ripple1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for riffle
v.

1754, "to make choppy water," American English, perhaps a variant of ruffle "make rough." The word meaning "shuffle" (cards) is first recorded 1894, probably echoic; hence that of "skim, leaf through quickly" (of papers, etc.) is from 1922. Related: Riffled; riffling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for riffle

riffle 1

noun

A hard swing at the ball; ripple: gives it a really good solid riffle

[1932+ Baseball; probably fr ripple fr rip]

riffle 2

noun

: Give that deck a good riffle

verb

To shuffle playing cards (1894+ Cardplaying)

[probably echoic]

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Word Value for riffle

12
13
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