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Robert

[rob-ert] /ˈrɒb ərt/
noun
1.
Henry Martyn
[mahr-tn] /ˈmɑr tn/ (Show IPA),
1837–1923, U.S. engineer and authority on parliamentary procedure: author of Robert's Rules of Order (1876, revised 1915).
2.
a male given name: from Germanic words meaning “glory” and “bright.”.

Robert I

noun
1.
("Robert the Devil") died 1035, duke of Normandy 1028–35 (father of William I of England).
2.
Also called Robert the Bruce, Robert Bruce. 1274–1329, king of Scotland 1306–29.

Ashe

[ash] /æʃ/
noun
1.
Arthur (Robert, Jr) 1943–93, U.S. tennis player.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for Robert
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • "I've got something to do pretty quick," thought Robert, with satisfaction.

    Brave and Bold Horatio Alger
  • The more she thought of Robert's losing his place, the more unfortunate it seemed.

    Brave and Bold Horatio Alger
  • But, notwithstanding this, she was a good mother, and Robert loved her.

    Brave and Bold Horatio Alger
  • Do you mean that you have earned ninety cents to-day, Robert?

    Brave and Bold Horatio Alger
  • "I'll put on the teakettle at once, Robert," said his mother, rising.

    Brave and Bold Horatio Alger
British Dictionary definitions for Robert

Ashe

/æʃ/
noun
1.
Arthur (Robert). 1943–93, US tennis player: US champion 1968; Wimbledon champion 1975

Robert I

/ˈrɒbət/
noun
1.
known as Robert the Bruce. 1274–1329, king of Scotland (1306–29): he defeated the English army of Edward II at Bannockburn (1314) and gained recognition of Scotland's independence (1328)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Robert

masc. proper name, from Old North French form of Old High German Hrodberht "bright-fame, bright with glory," from hrod- "fame, glory," from Proto-Germanic *hrothi-, + -berht "bright" (see Albert). The name of William the Conqueror's rebellious oldest son. "It was introduced by Normans during the reign of Edward the Confessor and became very popular" ["Dictionary of English Surnames"].

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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