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saucer

[saw-ser] /ˈsɔ sər/
noun
1.
a small, round, shallow dish to hold a cup.
2.
something resembling a saucer, as in shape.
Origin of saucer
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English < Old French saussier. See sauce, -er2
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for saucer
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • You need not look at the cup and saucer before you, Mr. Catley; those came from Derbyshire.

    Loss and Gain John Henry Newman
  • Guest (touching his lips with the cup and then returning it to its saucer).

  • Lay out flat in a pan of salt and water for an hour, with a weighted plate or saucer on top to hold under the water.

    Standard Paper-Bag Cookery Emma Paddock Telford
  • Peggy splashed the milk over the brim of Doggies cup and into the saucer.

    The Rough Road William John Locke
  • Do you know that this morning Jonas broke that valuable Dresden cup and saucer that I have always set such store by?

    Wild Heather L. T. Meade
  • Poor master was so astonished that he nearly dropped the saucer.

    Pussy and Doggy Tales Edith Nesbit
  • When the dawn was creeping ghostlike into the room and the night-light was tottering in its saucer, Essie stirred and woke.

    The Romance of His Life Mary Cholmondeley
  • Make a circle as big as a saucer, or a square equal in area.

  • When he picked up a piece as large as a saucer beside my pillow, I realized my narrow escape.

British Dictionary definitions for saucer

saucer

/ˈsɔːsə/
noun
1.
a small round dish on which a cup is set
2.
any similar dish
Derived Forms
saucerful, noun
saucerless, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Old French saussier container for sauce
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for saucer
n.

mid-14c., from Anglo-Latin saucerium and Old French saussier (Modern French saucière) "sauce dish," from Late Latin salsarium, neuter of salsarius "of or for salted things," from Latin salsus (see sauce (n.)). Originally a small dish or pan in which sauce is set on a table. Meaning "small, round, shallow vessel for supporting a cup and retaining any liquid which might be spilled" is attested from c.1702.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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8
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