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discrimination

[dih-skrim-uh-ney-shuh n]
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noun
  1. an act or instance of discriminating, or of making a distinction.
  2. treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which that person or thing belongs rather than on individual merit: racial and religious intolerance and discrimination.
  3. the power of making fine distinctions; discriminating judgment: She chose the colors with great discrimination.
  4. Archaic. something that serves to differentiate.

Origin of discrimination

1640–50; < Latin discrīminātiōn- (stem of discrīminātiō) a distinguishing. See discriminate, -ion
Related formsdis·crim·i·na·tion·al, adjectivean·ti·dis·crim·i·na·tion, adjectivenon·dis·crim·i·na·tion, nounpre·dis·crim·i·na·tion, nounself-dis·crim·i·na·tion, noun

Synonyms

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3. discernment, taste, acumen, perception.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018
British Dictionary definitions for self-discrimination

discrimination

noun
  1. unfair treatment of a person, racial group, minority, etc; action based on prejudice
  2. subtle appreciation in matters of taste
  3. the ability to see fine distinctions and differences
  4. electronics the selection of a signal having a particular frequency, amplitude, phase, etc, effected by the elimination of other signals by means of a discriminator
Derived Formsdiscriminational, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for self-discrimination

discrimination

n.

1640s, "the making of distinctions," from Late Latin discriminationem (nominative discriminatio), noun of action from past participle stem of discriminare (see discriminate). Especially in a prejudicial way, based on race, 1866, American English. Meaning "discernment" is from 1814.

It especially annoys me when racists are accused of 'discrimination.' The ability to discriminate is a precious facility; by judging all members of one 'race' to be the same, the racist precisely shows himself incapable of discrimination. [Christopher Hitchens]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper