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glorification

[glawr-uh-fi-key-shuh n, glohr-]
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noun
  1. a glorified or more splendid form of something.
  2. the act of glorifying.
  3. the state of being glorified.
  4. exaltation to the glory of heaven.

Origin of glorification

1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin glōrificātiōn- (stem of glōrificātiō), equivalent to glōrific(āre) to glorify + -ātiōn- -ation
Related formsde·glo·ri·fi·ca·tion, nounre·glo·ri·fi·ca·tion, nounself-glo·ri·fi·ca·tion, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for self-glorification

Historical Examples

  • It was difficult to avoid smiling at his boasting and self-glorification.

    Stories of Authors, British and American

    Edwin Watts Chubb

  • He grew a peculiar ability for self-glorification and for slugging the other man.

    Jewel Weed

    Alice Ames Winter

  • Even in the time of Moses this self-glorification was en evidence.

  • I do not mention these things with any desire for self-glorification.

  • He felt a peculiar self-consciousness, a self-glorification in his own misery.

    The Uncalled

    Paul Laurence Dunbar


British Dictionary definitions for self-glorification

glorification

noun
  1. the act of glorifying or state of being glorified
  2. informal an enhanced or favourably exaggerated version or account
  3. British informal a celebration
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for self-glorification

n.

1826, from self- + glorification.

glorification

n.

mid-15c. as a term in alchemy, "action of refining; state of being refined," from Late Latin glorificationem (nominative glorificatio), noun of action from past participle stem of glorificare (see glorify). From c.1500 in theology; general sense by mid-19c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper