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sherbet

[shur-bit]
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noun
  1. a frozen fruit-flavored mixture, similar to an ice, but with milk, egg white, or gelatin added.
  2. British. a drink made of sweetened fruit juice diluted with water and ice.
  3. a frozen fruit or vegetable purée, served either between courses to cleanse the palate or as a dessert.

Origin of sherbet

1595–1605; < Turkish < Persian sharbat < Arabic sharbah a drink
Can be confusedice cream sherbet sorbet
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for sherbert

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • I shook myself, drank some sherbert, and kicked off one shoe impatiently.

    Mr. Jacobs

    Arlo Bates

  • Soon chocolate, sherbert, and tea were added; but the places still maintained their status as social and temperance factors.

    All About Coffee

    William H. Ukers


British Dictionary definitions for sherbert

sherbet

noun
  1. a fruit-flavoured slightly effervescent powder, eaten as a sweet or used to make a drinklemon sherbet
  2. US and Canadian a water ice made from fruit juice, egg whites, milk, etcAlso called (in Britain and certain other countries): sorbet
  3. Australian slang beer
  4. a cooling Oriental drink of sweetened fruit juice
  5. Southern African informal a euphemistic word for shit taboo

Word Origin

C17: from Turkish şerbet, from Persian sharbat, from Arabic sharbah drink, from shariba to drink
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for sherbert

sherbet

n.

c.1600, zerbet, "drink made from diluted fruit juice and sugar," and cooled with fresh snow when possible, from Turkish serbet, from Persian sharbat, from Arabic sharba(t) "a drink," from shariba "he drank." Formerly also sherbert.Related to syrup, and cf. sorbet.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper