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Helpmann

[help-muh n] /ˈhɛlp mən/
noun
1.
Sir Robert (Murray) 1909–86, Australian dancer, choreographer, and actor.

Peel

[peel] /pil/
noun
1.
Sir Robert, 1788–1850, British political leader: founder of the London constabulary; prime minister 1834–35; 1841–46.
2.
a seaport on W Isle of Man: castle; resort.
3.
a river in N Yukon Territory and NW Northwest Territories, Canada, flowing E and N to the Mackenzie River. 425 miles (684 km) long.

Robinson

[rob-in-suh n] /ˈrɒb ɪn sən/
noun
1.
Bill ("Bojangles") 1878–1949, U.S. tap dancer.
2.
Boardman
[bawrd-muh n,, bohrd-] /ˈbɔrd mən,, ˈboʊrd-/ (Show IPA),
1876–1952, U.S. painter and illustrator, born in Nova Scotia.
3.
Brooks Calbert, born 1937, U.S. baseball player.
4.
Edward G (Emanuel Goldenberg) 1893–1973, U.S. actor, born in Romania.
5.
Edwin Arlington, 1869–1935, U.S. poet.
6.
Frank, born 1935, U.S. baseball player: first black manager in Major Leagues, 1975.
7.
Frederick John, Viscount Goderich
[gohd-rich] /ˈgoʊd rɪtʃ/ (Show IPA),
1st Earl of Ripon, 1782–1859, British statesman: prime minister 1827–28.
8.
Jack Roosevelt ("Jackie") 1919–72, U.S. baseball player.
9.
James Harvey, 1863–1936, U.S. historian.
10.
Mary, born 1944, Irish lawyer and politician: first woman president 1990–97.
11.
Ray (Walker Smith"Sugar Ray") 1921–1989, U.S. boxer.
12.
Sir Robert, 1886–1975, English chemist: Nobel prize 1947.
13.
a male given name.

Walpole

[wawl-pohl, wol-] /ˈwɔlˌpoʊl, ˈwɒl-/
noun
1.
Horace, 4th Earl of Orford
[awr-ferd] /ˈɔr fərd/ (Show IPA),
(Horatio Walpole) 1717–97, English novelist and essayist (son of Sir Robert Walpole).
2.
Sir Hugh Seymour, 1884–1941, English novelist, born in New Zealand.
3.
Sir Robert, 1st Earl of Orford
[awr-ferd] /ˈɔr fərd/ (Show IPA),
1676–1745, British statesman: prime minister 1715–17; 1721–42.
4.
a city in E Massachusetts.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for sir robert
Historical Examples
British Dictionary definitions for sir robert

Walpole

/ˈwɔːlˌpəʊl/
noun
1.
Horace, 4th Earl of Orford. 1717–97, British writer, noted for his letters and for his delight in the Gothic, as seen in his house Strawberry Hill and his novel The Castle of Otranto (1764)
2.
Sir Hugh (Seymour). 1884–1941, British novelist, born in New Zealand: best known for The Herries Chronicle (1930–33), a sequence of historical novels set in the Lake District
3.
Sir Robert, 1st Earl of Orford. 1676–1745, English Whig statesman. As first lord of the Treasury and Chancellor of the Exchequer (1721–42) he was effectively Britain's first prime minister

Helpmann

/ˈhɛlpmən/
noun
1.
Sir Robert. 1909–86, Australian ballet dancer and choreographer: his ballets include Miracle in the Gorbals (1944), Display (1965), and Yugen (1965)

peel1

/piːl/
verb
1.
(transitive) to remove (the skin, rind, outer covering, etc) of (a fruit, egg, etc)
2.
(intransitive) (of paint, etc) to be removed from a surface, esp through weathering
3.
(intransitive) (of a surface) to lose its outer covering of paint, etc esp through weathering
4.
(intransitive) (of a person or part of the body) to shed skin in flakes or (of skin) to be shed in flakes, esp as a result of sunburn
5.
(croquet) to put (another player's ball) through a hoop or hoops
6.
keep one's eyes peeled, keep one's eyes skinned, to watch vigilantly
noun
7.
the skin or rind of a fruit, etc
See also peel off
Word Origin
Old English pilian to strip off the outer layer, from Latin pilāre to make bald, from pilus a hair

peel2

/piːl/
noun
1.
a long-handled shovel used by bakers for moving bread, in an oven
Word Origin
C14 pele, from Old French, from Latin pāla spade, from pangere to drive in; see palette

peel3

/piːl/
noun
1.
(in Britain) a fortified tower of the 16th century on the borders between England and Scotland, built to withstand raids
Word Origin
C14 (fence made of stakes): from Old French piel stake, from Latin pālus; see pale², paling

Peel

/piːl/
noun
1.
John, real name John Robert Parker Ravenscroft. 1939–2004, British broadcaster; presented his influential Radio 1 music programme (1967–2004) and Radio 4's Home Truths (1998–2004)
2.
Sir Robert. 1788–1850, British statesman; Conservative prime minister (1834–35; 1841–46). As Home Secretary (1828–30) he founded the Metropolitan Police and in his second ministry carried through a series of free-trade budgets culminating in the repeal of the Corn Laws (1846), which split the Tory party
Derived Forms
Peelite, noun

Robinson

/ˈrɒbɪnsən/
noun
1.
Edward G., real name Emanuel Goldenberg. 1893–1973, US film actor, born in Romania, famous esp for gangster roles. His films include Little Caesar (1930), Brother Orchid (1940), Double Indemnity (1944), and All My Sons (1948)
2.
Edward Arlington. 1869–1935, US poet, author of narrative verse, often based on Arthurian legend. His works include Collected Poems (1922), The Man Who Died Twice (1924), and Tristram (1927)
3.
(William) Heath. 1872–1944, British cartoonist and book illustrator, best known for his comic drawings of fantastic machines
4.
John (Arthur Thomas)1919–83, British bishop and theologian, best known for his controversial Honest to God (1963), which popularized radical theological discussion. He was suffragan Bishop of Woolwich (1959–69)
5.
Mary. born 1944, Irish barrister and politician: president of Ireland 1990–97; UN high commissioner for human rights (1997–2002)
6.
Smokey, real name William Robinson. born 1940, US Motown singer, songwriter, and producer. His hits include "The Tears of a Clown" (1970) (with the Miracles) and "Being with you" (1981)
7.
"Sugar" Ray, real name Walker Smith. 1921–89, US boxer, winner of the world middleweight championship on five separate occasions
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Contemporary definitions for sir robert
noun

See baker's peel

Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Copyright © 2003-2014 Dictionary.com, LLC
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Word Origin and History for sir robert

peel

v.

"to strip off," developed from Old English pilian "to peel, skin, decorticate, strip the skin or ring," and Old French pillier, both from Latin pilare "to strip of hair," from pilus "hair" (see pile (n.3)). Probably also influenced by Latin pellis "skin, hide." Related: Peeled; peeling. Figurative expression keep (one's) eyes peeled be observant, be on the alert" is from 1853, American English.

n.

piece of rind or skin, 1580s, from earlier pill, pile (late 14c.), from peel (v.)).

"shovel-shaped instrument" used by bakers, etc., c.1400, from Old French pele (Modern French pelle) "shovel," from Latin pala "spade, shovel, baker's peel," of unknown origin.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for sir robert

peel

verb

  1. To undress; strip (1785+)
  2. peel out (1950s+ Hot rodders)
  3. : Many of the young people describe stealing a vehicle as ''peeling it'' (1980s+ Street talk)
The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with sir robert

peel

In addition to the idiom beginning with peel also see: keep one's eyes open (peeled)
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Difficulty index for Helpmann

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for sir

3
3
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