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skulk

or sculk

[skuhlk] /skʌlk/
verb (used without object)
1.
to lie or keep in hiding, as for some evil reason:
The thief skulked in the shadows.
2.
to move in a stealthy manner; slink:
The panther skulked through the bush.
3.
British. to shirk duty; malinger.
noun
4.
a person who skulks.
5.
a pack or group of foxes.
6.
Rare. an act or instance of skulking.
Origin of skulk
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English < Scandinavian (not in ON); compare Danish, Norwegian skulke, Swedish skolka play hooky
Related forms
skulker, noun
skulkingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. See lurk.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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Examples from the Web for skulk
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • He does not shuffle or prevaricate, dodge or skulk; but is honest, upright, and straightforward.

    Self-Help Samuel Smiles
  • He didn't mean to skulk like a whipped cur about his own decks.

    The Rescue Joseph Conrad
  • Instead, he must skulk in the thicket like a coyote until the man passed.

    Prairie Flowers

    James B. Hendryx
  • Sit there and skulk, while the others do the work, would you?

    Cutlass and Cudgel George Manville Fenn
  • I suppose you thought that, being off duty, you could skulk in your cabin and do nothing.

    Under the Chilian Flag Harry Collingwood
  • On coming within sight of us, the figure was seen to skulk and hide in the bushes.

    The War Trail Mayne Reid
  • "We do not skulk any longer like rats or city men in dark holes," he told them.

    The Defiant Agents Andre Alice Norton
  • Everything has seemed to cower, skulk, and hide, to run as if pursued.

    The Face of the Fields Dallas Lore Sharp
  • Yet no matter how you may hide and skulk and hunt, never a glimpse of one of them will you get.

    Everyday Adventures Samuel Scoville
British Dictionary definitions for skulk

skulk

/skʌlk/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to move stealthily so as to avoid notice
2.
to lie in hiding; lurk
3.
to shirk duty or evade responsibilities; malinger
noun
4.
a person who skulks
5.
(obsolete) a pack of foxes or other animals that creep about stealthily
Derived Forms
skulker, noun
Word Origin
C13: of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian skulka to lurk, Swedish skolka, Danish skulke to shirk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for skulk
v.

c.1200, from a Scandinavian source, cf. Norwegian skulke "to shirk, malinger," Danish skulke "to spare oneself, shirk," Swedish skolka "to shirk, skulk, slink, play truant." Common in Middle English but lacking in 15c.-16c. records; possibly reborrowed 17c. Related: Skulked; skulking; skulker; skulkery.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
15
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