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squeegee

[skwee-jee, skwee-jee]
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noun
  1. an implement edged with rubber or the like, for removing water from windows after washing, sweeping water from wet decks, etc.
  2. a similar and smaller device, as for removing excess water from photographic negatives or prints or for forcing paint, ink, etc., through a porous surface, as in serigraphy.
verb (used with object), squee·geed, squee·gee·ing.
  1. to sweep, scrape, or press with or as if with a squeegee.
  2. to force (paint, ink, etc.) through a screen in making a silk-screen print.

Origin of squeegee

First recorded in 1835–45; originally a nautical term; of obscure origin
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for squeegeed

Historical Examples

  • One asked me what I meant by coming aft all salt, like a head sea, making the deck wet after he'd squeegeed it down.

    Martin Hyde, The Duke's Messenger

    John Masefield

  • Aristo prints can be mounted direct from the ferrotype plate or the ground-glass to which they have been squeegeed to dry.


British Dictionary definitions for squeegeed

squeegee

less commonly squilgee

noun
  1. an implement with a rubber blade used for wiping away surplus water from a surface, such as a windowpane
  2. any of various similar devices used in photography for pressing the water out of wet prints or negatives or for squeezing prints onto a glazing surface
verb -gees, -geeing or -geed
  1. to remove (water or other liquid) from (something) by use of a squeegee
  2. (tr) to press down (a photographic print, etc) with a squeegee

Word Origin

C19: probably of imitative origin, influenced by squeeze
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for squeegeed

squeegee

n.

"wooden scraping instrument with a rubber blade," 1844, a nautical word, perhaps from squeege "to press" (1782), an alteration of squeeze.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper