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stoked

[stohkt]
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adjective Slang.
  1. exhilarated; excited.
  2. intoxicated or stupefied with a drug; high.

Origin of stoked

Related formsun·stoked, adjective

stoke1

[stohk]
verb (used with object), stoked, stok·ing.
  1. to poke, stir up, and feed (a fire).
  2. to tend the fire of (a furnace, especially one used with a boiler to generate steam for an engine); supply with fuel.
verb (used without object), stoked, stok·ing.
  1. to shake up the coals of a fire.
  2. to tend a fire or furnace.

Origin of stoke1

1675–85; < Dutch stoken to feed or stock a fire; see stock
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for stoked

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • The fire had been stoked in his absence, and was now burning gloriously.

    Mary Gray

    Katharine Tynan

  • The fireman threw open the furnace-door and stoked the fire as we approached.

    Aladdin &amp; Co.

    Herbert Quick

  • Then he stoked the fire, blew it, and set them all round it to warm themselves.

    Grimms' Fairy Tales

    The Brothers Grimm

  • He lighted up the furnace with dry wood, then stoked it full of coal.

    Darkness and Dawn

    George Allan England

  • In one case he stoked the furnaces of a coal mine for a week.

    A Captain in the Ranks

    George Cary Eggleston


British Dictionary definitions for stoked

stoked

adjective
  1. NZ informal very pleased; elatedreally stoked to have got the job

stoke

verb
  1. to feed, stir, and tend (a fire, furnace, etc)
  2. (tr) to tend the furnace of; act as a stoker for
See also stoke up

Word Origin

C17: back formation from stoker
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for stoked

stoke

v.

1650s (implied in stoker), "to feed and stir up a fire in a fireplace," from Dutch stoken "to stoke," from Middle Dutch stoken "to poke, thrust," related to stoc "stick, stump," from Proto-Germanic *stok-, variant of *stik-, *stek- "pierce, prick" (see stick (v.)). Stoked "enthusiastic" recorded in surfer slang by 1963, but the extension of the word to persons is older:

Having "stoked up," as the men called it, the brigades paraded at 10.30 a.m., ready for the next stage of the march. ["Cassell's History of the Boer War," 1901]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

stoked in Medicine

stoke

(stōk)
n.
  1. A unit of kinematic viscosity equal to that of a fluid with a viscosity of one poise and a density of one gram per milliliter.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.